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dc.contributor.authorZhang, Yanbo
dc.contributor.authorWang, Pengchong
dc.contributor.authorBroadley, Simon
dc.contributor.authorSun, Jing
dc.contributor.authorLi, Zhanjiang
dc.date.accessioned2021-12-08T02:44:26Z
dc.date.available2021-12-08T02:44:26Z
dc.date.issued2021
dc.identifier.issn2220-3206en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.5498/wjp.v11.i3.73en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/410601
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Illness anxiety disorder (IAD) is a common, distressing, and debilitating condition with the key feature being a persistent conviction of the possibility of having one or more serious or progressive physical disorders. Because eye movements are guided by visual-spatial attention, eye-tracking technology is a comparatively direct, continuous measure of attention direction and speed when stimuli are oriented. Researchers have tried to identify selective visual attention biases by tracking eye movements within dot-probe paradigms because dot-probe paradigm can distinguish these attentional biases more clearly. AIM: To examine the association between IAD and biased processing of illness-related information. METHODS: A case-control study design was used to record eye movements of individuals with IAD and healthy controls while participants viewed a set of pictures from four categories (illness-related, socially threatening, positive, and neutral images). Biases in initial orienting were assessed from the location of the initial shift in gaze, and biases in the maintenance of attention were assessed from the duration of gaze that was initially fixated on the picture per image category. RESULTS: The eye movement of the participants in the IAD group was characterized by an avoidance bias in initial orienting to illness-related pictures. There was no evidence of individuals with IAD spending significantly more time viewing illness-related images compared with other images. Patients with IAD had an attention bias at the early stage and overall attentional avoidance. In addition, this study found that patients with significant anxiety symptoms showed attention bias in the late stages of attention processing. CONCLUSION: Illness-related information processing biases appear to be a robust feature of IAD and may have an important role in explaining the etiology and maintenance of the disorder.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.sponsorshipBeijing Hospital Administration Beureau's Innovative Researchen_US
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.publisherBaishideng Publishing Groupen_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited States
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom73en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto86en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue3en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalWorld Journal of Psychiatryen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume11en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchMedical and Health Sciencesen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchClinical Sciencesen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchNeurosciencesen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode11en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1103en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1109en_US
dc.titleUsing eye movements in the dot-probe paradigm to investigate attention bias in illness anxiety disorderen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articlesen_US
dcterms.bibliographicCitationZhang, Y; Wang, P; Broadley, S; Sun, J; Li, Z, Using eye movements in the dot-probe paradigm to investigate attention bias in illness anxiety disorder, World Journal of Psychiatry, 2021, 11 (3), pp. 73-86en_US
dcterms.licensehttp://creativecommons.org/Licenses/by-nc/4.0/en_US
dc.date.updated2021-02-26T10:37:38Z
dc.description.versionVersion of Record (VoR)en_US
gro.rights.copyright© The Author(s) 2021. This article is an open-access article that was selected by an in-house editor and fully peer-reviewed by external reviewers. It is distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution NonCommercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited and the use is non-commercial. See: http://creativecommons.org/Licenses/by-nc/4.0/en_US
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorSun, Jing
gro.griffith.authorBroadley, Simon


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