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dc.contributor.authorGuan, Hongen_US
dc.contributor.authorVan Staden, Rudien_US
dc.contributor.authorJohnson, Newellen_US
dc.contributor.authorLoo, Yew-Chayeen_US
dc.contributor.editorJohn E. Dolbow and Tod A. Laursenen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-24T11:58:34Z
dc.date.available2017-04-24T11:58:34Z
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.date.modified2011-10-05T07:10:38Z
dc.identifier.issn1872-6925en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.finel.2011.03.005en_AU
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/41082
dc.description.abstractObjectives: using the finite element technique, the stress characteristics within the mandible are evaluated during a dynamic simulation of the implant insertion process. Implantation scenarios considered are implant thread forming (S1), cutting (S2) and the combination of forming and cutting (S3). Ultimately, the outcome of this study will provide an improved understanding of the failure mechanism consequential to the stress distribution characteristics in the mandible during the implantation process. Material and methods: parameters considered herein include bone cavity diameters of 3.9 mm (for S2), 4.25 mm (for S1) and a tapered cavity of diameters linearly varying from 3.9 to 4.25 mm (for S3). The bone-implant system is modelled using three-dimensional tetrahedral elements. Idealised bone and implant interaction properties are assumed. The stress profiles in the mandible are examined for all bone cavity diameters. Results and conclusion: the stress levels within the cancellous and cortical bone for S1 are significantly reduced when compared to scenarios S2 and S3. For S3, during the initial insertion steps, the stress is marginally less than that for S2. Close to the end of the insertion process, the stress level within the cancellous bone in S3 is approximately half way between that of S1 and S2. Generally for all scenarios, as the insertion depth increases the stress increases less significantly in the cortical bone than in the cancellous bone. Overall, different implant surface contact areas are the major contributors to the different stress characteristics of each scenario.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_AU
dc.format.extent5130732 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherElsevier BVen_US
dc.publisher.placeNetherlandsen_US
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom886en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto897en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue8en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalFinite Elements in Analysis and Designen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume47en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_AU
dc.subject.fieldofresearchBiomechanical Engineeringen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode090302en_US
dc.titleDynamic modelling and simulation of dental implant insertion process-A finite element studyen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.facultyGriffith Sciences, Griffith School of Engineeringen_US
gro.rights.copyrightCopyright 2011 Elsevier. This is the author-manuscript version of this paper. Reproduced in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. Please refer to the journal's website for access to the definitive, published version.en_AU
gro.date.issued2011
gro.hasfulltextFull Text


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