Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorVidal, Jo-Anne Marie
dc.contributor.authorOlley, Richard
dc.date.accessioned2022-01-14T01:38:32Z
dc.date.available2022-01-14T01:38:32Z
dc.date.issued2021
dc.identifier.issn1833-3818en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.24083/apjhm.v16i4.739en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/411460
dc.description.abstractObjective: The purpose of this systematic literature review is to appraise contemporary research literature examining the effects of mentoring on graduate registered nurses’ transition to practice objectively and systematically. These areas, specifically examined, are competence, job satisfaction, and retention. Three themes emerged from the research in this area. The themes are informal mentoring effectiveness, the extent of mentoring, and mentoring efficacy. Methods: The PRISMA method was implemented. Articles reviewed were written in English and published between December 2015 and December 2020 and obtained from the Griffith University Library electronic catalogue. A quality assessment of each record not excluded in the title and abstract analysis was undertaken using the method described by Kmet.[1] Those with a quality rating of 16 as a minimum are included in this systematic literature review. Results: Three quantitative, two qualitative and two - method research studies emerged after applying inclusion criteria, selection, and quality assessment. The analysis demonstrated the positive effects of mentoring on all three avenues with one mixed-method study that documented a downward trend in job satisfaction at six months. Conclusions: Mentoring is an effective transition to practice strategy for novice nurses. It affects competence, job satisfaction and retention positively. Retention and resignation rates worsen following 12 months of employment. Robust and rigorous studies are essential to justify long-term mentoring programs’ cost-effectiveness.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.publisherAustralasian College of Health Service Managementen_US
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom70en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto82en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue4en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalAsia Pacific Journal of Health Managementen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume16en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchNursingen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchHealth policyen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchSpecialist studies in educationen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode4205en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode440706en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode3904en_US
dc.titleSystematic Literature Review of The Effects Of Clinical Mentoring On New Graduate Registered Nurses’ Clinical Performance, Job Satisfaction And Job Retentionen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articlesen_US
dcterms.bibliographicCitationVidal, J-AM; Olley, R, Systematic Literature Review of The Effects Of Clinical Mentoring On New Graduate Registered Nurses’ Clinical Performance, Job Satisfaction And Job Retention, Asia Pacific Journal of Health Management, 16 (4), pp. 70-82en_US
dcterms.licensehttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/en_US
dc.date.updated2021-12-14T04:26:42Z
dc.description.versionVersion of Record (VoR)en_US
gro.rights.copyright© The Author(s) 2021. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License, which permits unrestricted, non-commercial use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, providing that the work is properly cited.en_US
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorOlley, Richard M.


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

  • Journal articles
    Contains articles published by Griffith authors in scholarly journals.

Show simple item record