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dc.contributor.authorDevilly, Grant James
dc.contributor.authorCallahan, Patch
dc.contributor.authorArmitage, Grenville
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T11:29:54Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T11:29:54Z
dc.date.issued2012
dc.date.modified2013-08-29T22:53:20Z
dc.identifier.issn0005-0067
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1742-9544.2010.00008.x
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/41201
dc.description.abstractStudies have found evidence that, after playing violent videogames for 20 min, people experience a mean short-term increase in aggression, hostility, and anger. The current research investigated whether or not players habituate during longer, more realistic lengths of play. Participants (N = 98) were randomly assigned to play the game Quake III Arena for either 20 or 60 min. Participants in the long condition showed a smaller change in state anger (CSA) from pre- to post-gameplay than those in the short condition, although this did not reach significance. Change in scores for gamers (not novice players) showed that short gaming led to a larger increase in anger ratings than long gaming.When the results for violent videogame players were analysed separately, there was no significant increase in anger post-gameplay-irrespective of length of time playing. Results also supported the hypotheses that females would show a significantly larger CSA than males and that participants previously unexposed to violent videogames would show a significantly larger CSA than exposed participants.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.description.publicationstatusYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sons Ltd.
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationN
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom98
dc.relation.ispartofpageto107
dc.relation.ispartofissue2
dc.relation.ispartofjournalAustralian Psychologist
dc.relation.ispartofvolume47
dc.rights.retentionY
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPersonality, Abilities and Assessment
dc.subject.fieldofresearchHealth, Clinical and Counselling Psychology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPsychology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchCognitive Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode170109
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode170106
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1701
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1702
dc.titleThe effect of violent videogame playtime on anger
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
gro.facultyGriffith Health, School of Applied Psychology
gro.date.issued2012
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text
gro.griffith.authorDevilly, Grant J.


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