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dc.contributor.authorDevilly, Grant J
dc.contributor.authorBrown, Lauren
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T11:29:54Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T11:29:54Z
dc.date.issued2011
dc.date.modified2011-10-07T04:29:55Z
dc.identifier.issn1068-316X
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/10683160903397524
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/41208
dc.description.abstractThis study explored differences in recall accuracy following experimental manipulations of two elements specific to two common approaches to trauma treatment: inducing saccadic eye movements during imagery rehearsal (Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing; EMDR) and imagery rehearsal without eye movements (Imaginal Exposure; IE). The study also looked into whether outcome was related to high suggestibility and distress characteristics. The sample consisted of 48 non-clinical adult participants. The results found no significant difference in false recalls between EMDR and IE. While the EMDR group did make more false recognitions, they also made more correct recalls than the IE group. In effect, those in the EMDR group appear to make more true recalls and more false recollections than those in the IE group. Irrespective of treatment condition, fewer positive words were recalled and recognized than neutral and trauma words. As well as all subjects displaying no avoidant encoding style for trauma words overall, we also noted no avoidant encoding style as a function of trauma history or treatment condition. Our results argue against the avoidant encoding hypothesis for those with a history of trauma and also suggest a lowered response criterion following EMDR.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.description.publicationstatusYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherRoutledge
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationN
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom529
dc.relation.ispartofpageto543
dc.relation.ispartofissue6
dc.relation.ispartofjournalPsychology, Crime and Law
dc.relation.ispartofvolume17
dc.rights.retentionY
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPsychology and Cognitive Sciences not elsewhere classified
dc.subject.fieldofresearchCriminology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPsychology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchLaw
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode179999
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1602
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1701
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1801
dc.titleThe role of imagery rehearsal with and without eye movements in the creation of false memories
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
gro.facultyGriffith Health, School of Applied Psychology
gro.date.issued2011
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text
gro.griffith.authorDevilly, Grant J.


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