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dc.contributor.authorSong, Xiaoyang
dc.contributor.authorNakamura, Akihiro
dc.contributor.authorSun, Zhenhua
dc.contributor.authorTang, Yong
dc.contributor.authorCao, Min
dc.date.accessioned2022-03-21T03:27:48Z
dc.date.available2022-03-21T03:27:48Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.issn0276-4741en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1659/MRD-JOURNAL-D-15-00109.1en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/413389
dc.description.abstractMontane habitats are characterized by high variation of environmental factors within small geographic ranges, which offers opportunities to explore how forest assemblages respond to changes in environmental conditions. Understanding the distributional transition of adult trees and seedlings will provide insight into the fate of forest biodiversity in response to future climate change. We investigated the elevational distribution of 156 species of adult trees and 152 species of seedlings in a tropical montane forest in Xishuangbanna, southwest China. Adult trees and seedlings were surveyed within 5 replicate plots established at each of 4 elevational bands (800, 1000, 1200, and 1400 m above sea level). We found that species richness of both adult trees and seedlings changed with elevation, showing a notable decline in diversity values from 1000 to 1200 m. Tree species composition also demonstrated distinct differences between 1000 and 1200 m, marking the division between tropical seasonal rain forest (800 and 1000 m) and tropical montane evergreen broad-leaved forest (1200 and 1400 m). The results suggested that soil moisture and temperature regimes were associated with elevational distribution of tree species in this region. We also observed that seedlings from certain species found at high elevations were also distributed in low-elevation zones, but no seedlings of species from low elevations were distributed in high-elevation zones. The increase in temperature and droughts predicted for this region may result in the contraction of tropical seasonal rain forest at lower elevations and a downhill shift of higher tropical montane tree species.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.publisherInternational Mountain Societyen_US
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom342en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto354en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue3en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalMountain Research and Developmenten_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume36en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchTerrestrial ecologyen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchClimate change impacts and adaptationen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode310308en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode4101en_US
dc.subject.keywordsScience & Technologyen_US
dc.subject.keywordsLife Sciences & Biomedicineen_US
dc.subject.keywordsPhysical Sciencesen_US
dc.subject.keywordsEnvironmental Sciencesen_US
dc.subject.keywordsGeography, Physicalen_US
dc.titleElevational Distribution of Adult Trees and Seedlings in a Tropical Montane Transect, Southwest Chinaen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articlesen_US
dcterms.bibliographicCitationSong, X; Nakamura, A; Sun, Z; Tang, Y; Cao, M, Elevational Distribution of Adult Trees and Seedlings in a Tropical Montane Transect, Southwest China, Mountain Research and Development, 2016, 36 (3), pp. 342-354en_US
dcterms.licensehttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en_US
dc.date.updated2022-03-18T05:58:41Z
dc.description.versionVersion of Record (VoR)en_US
gro.rights.copyright© 2016 Song et al. This open access article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons. org/licenses/by/4.0/). Please credit the authors and the full source.en_US
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorNakamura, Aki


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