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dc.contributor.authorShacklock, Kateen_US
dc.contributor.authorBrunetto, Yvonneen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T13:15:24Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T13:15:24Z
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.date.modified2011-10-28T07:03:22Z
dc.identifier.issn13652648en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1365-2648.2011.05709.xen_AU
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/41341
dc.description.abstractAims The aims of the study were to examine how seven variables impacted upon the intention of hospital nurses to continue working as nurses and to investigate whether there are generational differences in these impacts. Background There is a critical shortage of trained nurses working as nurses in Australia, as in many other OECD countries. The retention of nurses has been examined from the traditional management perspectives; however this paper presents a different approach (Meaning of Working theory). Methods A self-report survey of 900 nurses employed across four states of Australia was completed in 2008. The sample was hospital nurses in Australia from three generational cohorts - Baby Boomers (born in Australia between 1946 and 1964), Generation X (1965-1979) and Generation Y (1980-2000). Results/Findings Six variables were found to influence the combined nurses' intentions to continue working as nurses: 1. Work-family conflict 2. Perceptions of autonomy 3. Attachment to work 4. Importance of working to the individual 5. Supervisor-subordinate relationship 6. Interpersonal relationships at work There were differences in the variables affecting the three generations, but attachment to work was the only common variable across all generations, affecting GenYs the strongest. Conclusion The shortage of nurses is conceptualised differently in this paper to assist in finding solutions. However, the results varied for the three generations, suggesting the need to tailor different retention strategies to each age group. Implications for management and policy planning are discussed.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_AU
dc.format.extent146307 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd.en_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom36en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto46en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue1en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalJournal of Advanced Nursingen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume68en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_AU
dc.subject.fieldofresearchHuman Resources Managementen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode150305en_US
dc.titleThe intention to continue nursing: work variables affecting three nurse generations in Australiaen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.facultyGriffith Business School, Dept of Employment Relations and Human Resourcesen_US
gro.rights.copyrightCopyright 2011 Blackwell Publishing. This is the pre-peer reviewed version of the following article: The intention to continue nursing: Work factors affecting three nurse generations in Australia, Journal of Advanced Nursing, which has been published in final form at http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2648.2011.05709.x.en_AU
gro.date.issued2011
gro.hasfulltextFull Text


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