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dc.contributor.authorLiew, Leongen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T12:14:59Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T12:14:59Z
dc.date.issued2012en_US
dc.date.modified2014-08-28T05:04:43Z
dc.identifier.issn10357718en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/10357718.2011.570243en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/41424
dc.description.abstractThe re-emergence of China in the new millennium has increased global demand for mineral resources, causing a return to the Australian vision of national prosperity tied to primary exports-this time minerals. Many analysts have questioned the wisdom of anchoring Australia's prosperity to being a quarry for Asia. The current mining boom has enabled Australia to postpone, but has not removed, the need to develop new industries to sustain a high standard of living in a future marked by global warming. Innovation is essential to the development of new industries that can contribute to a strong and sustainable economy, but cultivating innovation requires serious national commitment over the long term. This requires Australia to seriously reconsider education policy at all levels and to abandon what the author terms 'rational choice populism'-a culture of anti-intellectualism and an unequivocal belief in a form of market fundamentalism-that discourages the advanced level of investment in human capital required for innovation.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_US
dc.format.extent83036 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherRoutledgeen_US
dc.publisher.placeAustraliaen_US
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_US
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom542en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto553en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue5en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalAustralian Journal of International Affairsen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume66en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchAustralian Government and Politicsen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPublic Administrationen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode160601en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode160509en_US
dc.titleAs Asia's quarry: implications for Australiaen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.facultyGriffith Business School, Department of International Business and Asian Studiesen_US
gro.rights.copyrightCopyright [year] Routledge. This is the author-manuscript version of this paper. Reproduced in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. Please refer to the journal's website for access to the definitive, published version.en_US
gro.date.issued2012
gro.hasfulltextFull Text


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