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dc.contributor.authorMarchetti, Elenaen_US
dc.contributor.authorRansley, Janeten_US
dc.contributor.editorDavid Cowanen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T12:01:54Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T12:01:54Z
dc.date.issued2005en_US
dc.date.modified2007-04-02T05:18:51Z
dc.identifier.issn09646639en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/4147
dc.description.abstractLike other western legal systems, Australian law is based on notions of the rule of law, justice and equality. Legal formalistic ideology would have us believe that as long as the law as it appears 'on the books' is applied equally for all, justice will prevail. For Indigenous Australian people, formal equality means that their claims for land, compensation and the recognition of their culture must be assessed through the eyes of white judges in white courts. Even when those judges strive to apply the law equally, they will inevitably be applying Eurocentric beliefs and values. In two recent significant cases concerning Indigenous claims for their removal from their families as children, those beliefs and values have tended to invalidate not only the legal claims themselves, but also aspects of the Indigenous culture. This article argues that the formal application of legal principles to these claims by Australian courts and judges leads to the exclusion of Indigenous narratives, which ultimately can be construed as evidence of unconscious racism. Charles Lawrence's cultural meaning test is used to critique the reasoning of the judges in two leading Australian cases concerning the 'stolen generation' and to expose the unconscious racism that still exists in the Australian liberal legal system.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_AU
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherSage Publicationsen_US
dc.publisher.placeLondonen_US
dc.publisher.urihttp://sls.sagepub.com/cgi/content/abstract/14/4/533en_AU
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom533en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto552en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue4en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalSocial & Legal Studiesen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume14en_US
dc.rights.retentionNen_AU
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode390305en_US
dc.titleUnconscious Racism: Scrutinizing Judicial Reasoning in 'Stolen Generation' Casesen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.rights.copyrightCopyright 2005 Sage Publications. Reproduced in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. First published in Social & Legal Studies. This journal is available online: http://sls.sagepub.com/content/vol14/issue4/en_AU
gro.date.issued2005
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text


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    Contains articles published by Griffith authors in scholarly journals.

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