Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorMcMeniman, Erinen_US
dc.contributor.authorMoore, Romayneen_US
dc.contributor.authorYelland, Michaelen_US
dc.contributor.authorMcClure, Roden_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-24T11:35:36Z
dc.date.available2017-04-24T11:35:36Z
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.date.modified2012-02-10T02:48:30Z
dc.identifier.issn14487527en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1071/PY10041en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/41691
dc.description.abstractGeneral practitioners (GPs) are ideally placed to identify and treat childhood obesity, but its prevalence continues to rise and evidence for effective GP interventions is lacking. Further analysis of the barriers to effective identification and management of childhood obesity is warranted. This survey aimed to explore how Queensland GPs feel about managing the growing problem of childhood obesity. A cross-sectional survey was sent to a random sample of 573 Queensland GPs about perceptions of diagnosis and management of childhood obesity. A total of 30% of GPs responded (n = 170). The main perceived obstacles to identification of childhood obesity were uncertainty about definition criteria and how to calculate body mass index, and lack of access to body mass index percentile charts. The main perceived obstacles in managing childhood obesity were lack of financial incentive, time constraints, lack of health system support and parental resistance. Only 22% of respondents indicated awareness of the National Health and Medical Research Council guidelines for management of obese children and 92% had never used any formal clinical guidelines in assessment or management of childhood obesity. Addressing these barriers to identification of childhood obesity by GPs may facilitate more effective management. Strategies include greater emphasis on this issue in general practice training, financial incentives for diagnosis and management, incorporating clinical management guidelines into medical software, and increasing allied and community health support.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_US
dc.format.extent106787 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherCSIRO Publishingen_US
dc.publisher.placeAustraliaen_US
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_US
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom60en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto65en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue1en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalAustralian Journal of Primary Healthen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume17en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchMedical and Health Sciences not elsewhere classifieden_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode119999en_US
dc.titleChildhood obesity: how do Australian general practitioners feel about managing this growing health problem?en_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.rights.copyrightCopyright 2011 CSIRO. This is the author-manuscript version of this paper. Reproduced in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. Please refer to the journal's website for access to the definitive, published version.en_US
gro.date.issued2011
gro.hasfulltextFull Text


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

  • Journal articles
    Contains articles published by Griffith authors in scholarly journals.

Show simple item record