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dc.contributor.authorBoschen, Mark J
dc.contributor.authorWilson, K Louise
dc.contributor.authorFarrell, Lara J
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T13:09:33Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T13:09:33Z
dc.date.issued2011
dc.date.modified2012-02-10T02:52:38Z
dc.identifier.issn0005-7967
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.brat.2011.05.001
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/41697
dc.description.abstractRepeated checking has been demonstrated to lead to reductions in memory confidence in several previous studies using student and clinical samples. This process of reduced confidence in memory and detail for memory, are thought to arise from the inhibition of perceptual processing that develops during repeated checking. Our research investigated whether reduced memory confidence from repeated checking could be attenuated through the use of novel stimuli during the repeated checking task. Three groups were generated through random assignment of 65 undergraduate students. As seen in previous research, individuals who repeatedly checked a stimulus (a virtual stovetop) showed reduced memory confidence, vividness, and detail, when compared with individuals who repeatedly checked a different stimulus. A third group in which the colour of the repeatedly-checked stovetop changed every five trials showed no significant decline in memory confidence between the pre-test and post-test. Results suggest that increased memory distrust can be ameliorated through the use of stimuli with characteristics that are novel and distinctive. Findings are discussed in the context of the existing model of repeated checking and memory confidence, and implications for treatment methods are presented.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.description.publicationstatusYes
dc.format.extent121238 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherElsevier
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationN
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom466
dc.relation.ispartofpageto471
dc.relation.ispartofissue8
dc.relation.ispartofjournalBehaviour Research and Therapy
dc.relation.ispartofvolume49
dc.rights.retentionY
dc.subject.fieldofresearchCognitive and computational psychology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode5204
dc.titleAttenuating memory distrust in a repeated checking task
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
gro.facultyGriffith Health, School of Applied Psychology
gro.rights.copyright© 2011 Elsevier. The attached file is reproduced here in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. Please refer to the journal's website for access to the definitive, published version.
gro.date.issued2011
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorFarrell, Lara J.
gro.griffith.authorBoschen, Mark J.


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