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dc.contributor.authorStewart, Rodneyen_US
dc.contributor.authorWillis, Rachelleen_US
dc.contributor.authorPanuwatwanich, Kriengsaken_US
dc.contributor.authorSahin, Ozen_US
dc.contributor.editorAhmet Cakiren_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-24T09:23:03Z
dc.date.available2017-04-24T09:23:03Z
dc.date.issued2013en_US
dc.date.modified2014-08-28T05:03:59Z
dc.identifier.issn13623001en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/0144929X.2011.577195en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/41733
dc.description.abstractResidential households have the potential to conserve water, especially in behaviourally influenced end uses such as showering. Visual display monitors detailing shower water consumption parameters provide householders with a better understanding of their water use consumption and serve as a prompt to conserve. This longitudinal study first applied high resolution smart meters to create a registry of shower end use event parameters (i.e. shower duration, flow rate and duration) before and after the introduction of an alarming visual display monitor. The study showed a statistically significant mean reduction of 15.40 L (27%) in shower event volumes shortly after the implementation of the shower monitor. However, two subsequent smart metering reads indicated that shower end use water consumption savings diminished over time and mean showering volumes reverted back to their pre-intervention level after 4 months. That is, the longitudinal study provides empirical evidence that technological devices informing resource consumption may not be effective unless instilled habits or attitudes can be also modified; old habits die hard. Follow-up questionnaire surveys allowed for qualitative interpretations of the behavioural findings, through demographic summaries, residents' perceptions on shower monitor performance and their use of device over time, to name a few.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_US
dc.format.extent1840267 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherTaylor and Francisen_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_US
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom695en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto711en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue7en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalBehaviour & Information Technologyen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume32en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchEnvironmental Managementen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchWater Resources Engineeringen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchEnvironmental Sociologyen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode050205en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode090509en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode160802en_US
dc.titleShowering behavioural response to alarming visual display monitors: longitudinal mixed method studyen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.facultyGriffith Sciences, Griffith School of Engineeringen_US
gro.rights.copyrightCopyright 2011 Taylor & Francis. This is an electronic version of an article published in Behaviour and Information Technology, iFirst, Version of record first published: 20 May 2011. Behaviour and Information Technology is available online at: http://www.tandfonline.com with the open URL of your article.en_US
gro.date.issued2013
gro.hasfulltextFull Text


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