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dc.contributor.authorStockwell-Smith, Gillianen_US
dc.contributor.authorJones, Cindyen_US
dc.contributor.authorMoyle, Wendyen_US
dc.contributor.editorAnn McMahon and Julienne Meyeren_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T12:41:46Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T12:41:46Z
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.date.modified2012-09-14T01:15:37Z
dc.identifier.issn17449871en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/1744987111414535en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/41835
dc.description.abstractResearch aim: Little is known regarding the pressures of working within dementia care units, as the majority of literature has focused broadly on long-term care rather than the provision of specialised dementia care. This study aimed to explore the perceptions of staff in relation to their capacity to manage behaviour and care needs of people with dementia living within the dementia-specific environment. Individual interviews were conducted with 35 care staff from three dementia care units in Brisbane, Australia. Major findings: Four themes were identified: role definition, relationships, workplace environment, and workforce issues. Although the findings highlight the importance of peer support for staff when managing difficult situations, questions regarding the quality of peer support and its impact on care provision were raised. Conclusions: Dementia units are complex systems with well-motivated and educated staff contributing to the effectiveness of the care. An understanding of care staff, perceptions of their role and its effects on care practices can help to identify appropriate support structures and training strategies, thereby improving job satisfaction for staff and quality of life for the residents with dementia.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_US
dc.format.extent204440 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherSage Publications Ltd.en_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationYen_US
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom400en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto412en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue5en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalJournal of Research in Nursingen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume16en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchAged Care Nursingen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode111001en_US
dc.title'You've got to keep account of heads all the time': staff perceptions of caring for people with dementiaen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.facultyGriffith Health, School of Nursing and Midwiferyen_US
gro.rights.copyrightCopyright 2011 SAGE Publications. This is the author-manuscript version of the paper. Reproduced in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. Please refer to the journal's website for access to the definitive, published version.en_US
gro.date.issued2011
gro.hasfulltextFull Text


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