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dc.contributor.authorD. Kapusta, Nestoren_US
dc.contributor.authorS. Tran, Ulrichen_US
dc.contributor.authorR. H. Rockett, Ianen_US
dc.contributor.authorDe Leo, Diegoen_US
dc.contributor.authorP. E. Naylor, Charlesen_US
dc.contributor.authorNiederkrothenthaler, Thomasen_US
dc.contributor.authorVoracek, Martinen_US
dc.contributor.authorEtzersdorfer, Elmaren_US
dc.contributor.authorSonneck, Gernoten_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T11:39:04Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T11:39:04Z
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.date.modified2013-08-29T21:58:27Z
dc.identifier.issn15383636en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1001/archgenpsychiatry.2011.66en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/41881
dc.description.abstractContext Suicides are prone to misclassification during death ascertainment procedures. This problem has generated frequent criticism of the validity of suicide mortality statistics. Objective To employ an external measure of the validity of cause-of-death statistics (ie, national autopsy rates) and to examine potential misclassification of suicide across countries from Europe to Central and Northern Asia. Design Cross-national analysis. Setting Thirty-five countries. Participants Aggregated mortality data. Main Outcome Measures Data from 35 countries during the period from 1979 to 2007 were used to analyze the association of suicide rates with autopsy rates and death rates of undetermined and ill-defined causes, respectively. Analyses were cross-sectional and longitudinal. Results Cross-sectionally, a 1% difference in autopsy rates among nations was associated with a suicide rate difference of 0.49 per 100 000 population. Longitudinally, a 1% decrease in the autopsy rate aligned with a decrease of 0.42 per 100 000 population in the suicide rate. These cross-sectional and longitudinal associations were robust after adjustment for unemployment, degree of urbanization, and prevalence of undetermined or ill-defined deaths. Associations strengthened when analyses were confined to 19 European Union member countries. Conclusion Autopsy rates may spatially and temporally affect the validity of suicide mortality statistics. Caution should be exercised in comparing international suicide rates and evaluating interventions that target suicide rate reduction.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_US
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherAmerican Medical Associationen_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_US
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom1050en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto1057en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue10en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalArchives of General Psychiatryen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume68en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchMental Healthen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode111714en_US
dc.titleDeclining Autopsy Rates and Suicide Misclassification: A Cross-national Analysis of 35 Countriesen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.date.issued2011
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text


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