Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorE. Hollis-Peel, Meghanen_US
dc.contributor.authorReynald, Danielleen_US
dc.contributor.authorvan Bavel, Mauden_US
dc.contributor.authorElffers, Henken_US
dc.contributor.authorC. Welsh, Brandonen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T15:53:05Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T15:53:05Z
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.date.modified2012-02-10T01:21:58Z
dc.identifier.issn15730751en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s10611-011-9309-2en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/41884
dc.description.abstractCohen and Felson's (Cohen and Felson American Sociological Review 44 (4):588-608, 1979) routine activity theory posits that for a crime to occur three necessary elements must converge in time and space: motivated offenders, suitable targets, and the absence of capable guardianship. Capable guardians can serve as a key actor in the crime event model; one who can disrupt, either directly or indirectly, the interaction between a motivated offender and a suitable target. This article critically reviews the literature on guardianship for crime prevention. Our specific focus is two-fold: (1) to review the way guardianship has been operationalized and measured, and (2) to review experimental and quasi-experimental evaluations and field tests of guardianship. Research on routine activities has had an uneven focus resulting in the neglect of the guardianship component (Reynald Crime Prevention and Community Safety 11(1):1-20, 2009; Sampson et al. Security Journal 23(1):37-51, 2010; Tewksbury and Mustaine Criminal Justice and Behavior 30(3):302-327, 2003; Wilcox et al. Criminology 45(4):771-803 2007). Evaluations of guardianship-related interventions demonstrate support for the theoretical construct; however, high-quality field tests of guardianship are wholly lacking. Implications for theory and research are discussed.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_US
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherSpringer Netherlandsen_US
dc.publisher.placeNetherlandsen_US
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_US
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom53en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto70en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue1en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalCrime, Law & Social Changeen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume56en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchCriminology not elsewhere classifieden_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode160299en_US
dc.titleGuardianship for crime prevention: a critical review of the literatureen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.date.issued2011
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text


Files in this item

FilesSizeFormatView

There are no files associated with this item.

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

  • Journal articles
    Contains articles published by Griffith authors in scholarly journals.

Show simple item record