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dc.contributor.authorDe Leo, Diegoen_US
dc.contributor.authorSveticic, Jernejaen_US
dc.contributor.authorMilner, Allisonen_US
dc.contributor.editorG.S. Malhien_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T11:39:05Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T11:39:05Z
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.date.modified2012-02-10T01:39:53Z
dc.identifier.issn00048674en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.3109/00048674.2011.570310en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/41904
dc.description.abstractObjective: Suicide among Indigenous Australians is a well-recognized public health issue. Due to scarcity of epidemiological investigations in this area the exact size of this problem and its main characteristics remain uncertain. In this paper we present trends and methods of Indigenous suicides based on the Queensland Suicide Register for the period 1994-2007. Methods: Trends of age-standardized suicide rates were calculated for Indigenous and non-Indigenous populations. Suicide methods were compared between the two groups, with particular focus on hanging. Discriminant analysis was used to ascertain the size of under-estimation of suicide rates due to a considerable number of cases with unknown ethnicity in the Queensland Suicide Register. Results: Between 1994 and 2007, Indigenous populations had suicide rates 2.2 times higher than non-Indigenous Australians. Age-specific suicide rates for Indigenous men were highest in the 25 - 34 age group, while in women they were highest among 15 - 24 year olds. In children younger than 15 years, Indigenous suicide rate was almost ten times higher than of non-Indigenous counterparts. More than 90% of Indigenous suicides occurred by hanging. It was estimated that lack of information about ethnicity for 7% of suicide cases might have caused an under-estimation of Indigenous suicide mortality for 15.4% in men and 9.1% in women in the period 1994-2007. Conclusions: Suicide mortality of Indigenous Australians has reached alarming levels, particularly among youths. The unique profile of Indigenous suicides indicates the need for specifically tailored preventative programmes. Read More: http://informahealthcare.com/doi/abs/10.3109/00048674.2011.570310en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_US
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherSage Publications Ltd.en_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_US
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom532en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto538en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue7en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalAustralian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatryen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume45en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchAboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Healthen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchMental Healthen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode111701en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode111714en_US
dc.titleSuicide in Indigenous people in Queensland, Australia: trends and methods, 1994-2007en_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.facultyGriffith Health, Australian Institute for Suicide Research & Preventionen_US
gro.date.issued2011
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text


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