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dc.contributor.authorBillett, Stephenen_US
dc.contributor.editorDorchy, P., Gijbels, D., Segers, M & Van Den Bossche, Pen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T12:12:22Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T12:12:22Z
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.date.modified2012-02-10T02:15:11Z
dc.identifier.isbn9780415618946en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/41927
dc.description.abstractThis chapter describes and elaborates the concept of the 'learning curriculum' as a means of organising and enacting learning experiences in practice settings (e.g. workplaces). It does this through identifying how the concept of organising learning experiences arises through both the imperatives of practice settings and their goals, but also through elaborating how these experiences have important pedagogic qualities. Drawing upon ideas that arose from anthropological studies (e.g. (Lave 1990) about how learning is organised in settings where occupational practices are enacted, a theory of organising and enacting the learning practice is discussed and detailed. In all, it is proposed that although curriculum needs to be considered in personal terms, that the organisation of experiences in practice setting can be organised and enacted in ways that can enhance both individuals' engagement and learning. The chapter has commenced above with an account of experiences or a personal curriculum in educational institutions and workplaces that were formative in developing my occupational skills as both a clothing technician and also as a vocational educator. In some ways, these experiences established my interest in and understanding of the worth of organising and sequencing of these experiences to secure better learning outcomes, and also the importance of viewing the curriculum as something individuals experience. Following from here is an elaboration of the concept of the learning curriculum as articulated by Lave (1990) that is subsequently discussed as being a legitimate model of curriculum and means for progressing the development of professional capacities in workplace settings. This elaboration of the learning curriculum includes a consideration of the identification of and engagement with richly pedagogic activities in workplace settings.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_US
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherRoutledgeen_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.publisher.urihttp://www.routledge.com/books/details/9780415618946/en_US
dc.relation.ispartofbooktitleTheories of Learning for the Workplace: Building blocks for training and professional development programsen_US
dc.relation.ispartofchapter2en_US
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_US
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom17en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto36en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchTechnical, Further and Workplace Educationen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode130108en_US
dc.titleWorkplace curriculum: practice and propositionsen_US
dc.typeBook chapteren_US
dc.type.descriptionB1 - Book Chapters (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeB - Book Chaptersen_US
gro.facultyArts, Education & Law Group, School of Education and Professional Studiesen_US
gro.date.issued2011
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text


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