Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorB. Ryan, Michaelen_US
dc.contributor.authorA. Valiant, Gordonen_US
dc.contributor.authorMcDonald, Kimberlyen_US
dc.contributor.authorTaunton, Jacken_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T16:06:26Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T16:06:26Z
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.date.modified2012-05-15T22:44:21Z
dc.identifier.issn03063674en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1136/bjsm.2009.069849en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/41950
dc.description.abstractBackground The present study examines the injury status in women runners who are randomised to receive a neutral, stability or motion control running shoe. Methods 81 female runners were categorised into three different foot posture types (39 neutral, 30 pronated, 12 highly pronated) and randomly assigned a neutral, stability or motion control running shoe. Runners underwent baseline testing to record training history, as well as leg alignment, before commencing a 13-week half marathon training programme. Outcome measures included number of missed training days due to pain and three visual analogue scale (VAS) items for pain during rest, activities of daily living and with running. Results 194 missed training days were reported by 32% of the running population with the stability shoe reporting the fewest missed days (51) and the motion control shoe (79) the most. There was a significant main effect (p<0.001) for footwear condition in both the neutral and pronated foot types: the motion control shoe reporting greater levels of pain in all three VAS items. In neutral feet, the neutral shoe reported greater values of pain while running than the stability shoe; in pronated feet, the stability shoe reported greater values of pain while running than the neutral shoe. No significant effects were reported for the highly pronated foot, although this was limited by an inadequate sample size. Conclusion The findings of this study suggest that our current approach of prescribing in-shoe pronation control systems on the basis of foot type is overly simplistic and potentially injurious.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_US
dc.format.extent379918 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherBMJ Groupen_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_US
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom715en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto721en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue9en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalBritish Journal of Sports Medicineen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume45en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchSports Medicineen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode110604en_US
dc.titleThe effect of three different levels of footwear stability on pain outcomes in women runners: a randomised control trialen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.rights.copyrightCopyright remains with the authors 2011. The attached file is reproduced here in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. For information about this journal please refer to the journal’s website or contact the authors.en_US
gro.date.issued2011
gro.hasfulltextFull Text


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

  • Journal articles
    Contains articles published by Griffith authors in scholarly journals.

Show simple item record