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dc.contributor.authorTuttle, Neilen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-24T10:35:25Z
dc.date.available2017-04-24T10:35:25Z
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.date.modified2014-08-15T01:53:31Z
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/42061
dc.description.abstractPsychomotor skills employed by physiotherapists are just techniques unless they are integrated into a responsive approach respecting an individual patient's goals and values. Skills in action, perception and interpretation are essential for effective physiotherapy practice, but are time consuming to teach and difficult to learn. The demands placed on teaching time by the increasing scope of physiotherapy practice combined with the subjective nature of manual techniques make it increasingly difficult to retain sufficient teaching time for adequate skill development. The subjectivity of skill development can be reduced through knowledge of the physical characteristics that are related to symptoms or pathology. Recent research in areas including spasticity, lymphoedema and musculoskeletal conditions has begun to quantify how complex, palpable physical characteristics are related to patient impairments. Subjectivity can also be reduced if students have skills such as abilities to produce consistent forces or assess stiffness, temperature or viscosity that are objectively rather than subjectively referenced. These generic skills are typically assumed rather than taught, but can now be developed through independent learning using physical and/or electronically modulated (haptic) models. Task-specific simulators have been shown to improve skill development in surgical procedures, but are less well developed for manual assessment or treatment techniques. Types of sensors as well as physical, haptic and hybrid simulators that are currently employed or under development in a variety of professions will be demonstrated and discussed. Examples will also be presented of how even the most sophisticated technology must be integrated into an efficient and effective teaching program.en_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_US
dc.format.extent48728 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherAustralian Physiotherapy Associationen_US
dc.publisher.placeMelbourneen_US
dc.publisher.urihttp://physiotherapy.asn.auen_US
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_US
dc.relation.ispartofconferencenameAustralian Physiotherapy Association (APA) Congress 2010en_US
dc.relation.ispartofconferencetitleAPA Congress 2010: Changing Scope for a Changing Futureen_US
dc.relation.ispartofdatefrom2010-10-28en_US
dc.relation.ispartofdateto2010-10-30en_US
dc.relation.ispartoflocationGold Coasten_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPhysiotherapyen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode110317en_US
dc.titleOnce more with feeling: future directions for teaching psychomotor skillsen_US
dc.typeConference outputen_US
dc.type.descriptionE3 - Conference Publications (Extract Paper)en_US
dc.type.codeE - Conference Publicationsen_US
gro.rights.copyrightCopyright 2010 Australian Physiotherapy Association. The attached file is reproduced here in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. Please refer to the conference's website for access to the definitive, published version.en_US
gro.date.issued2010
gro.hasfulltextFull Text


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    Contains papers delivered by Griffith authors at national and international conferences.

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