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dc.contributor.authorPendergast, Donnaen_US
dc.contributor.authorGarvis, Susieen_US
dc.contributor.authorKanasa, Harryen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-24T12:40:48Z
dc.date.available2017-04-24T12:40:48Z
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.date.modified2012-02-10T02:26:23Z
dc.identifier.issn15523934en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1552-3934.2011.02079.xen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/42173
dc.description.abstractIn 2010, a newspaper article speculating about the inclusion of cooking in the Queensland, Australia, school curriculum was published. Readers were invited to post comments to a newspaper-managed blog. Ninetyseven posts were made. These posts (N = 97) comprise the data for this study. Data were analyzed using Leximancer to determine frequency and connection of terminology. The analysis found ''cooking'' to be the core concept, connected to either the ''school'' (formal learning) and / or to the ''home'' (informal learning). Content analysis determined the themes and their relative frequency. Three main themes were generated: informal food literacy learning, formal food literacy learning in schools, and formal food literacy learning in home economics. Subthemes in the formal food literacy theme included: status (should a home economics course be compulsory?), enjoyment of home economics in school), and gender (with many positive comments from male respondents). The findings of this study represent a first step in understanding the potential contribution of home economics to develop food literacy.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_US
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sons, Inc.en_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_US
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom415en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto430en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue4en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalFamily & Consumer Sciences Research Journalen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume39en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchEducation not elsewhere classifieden_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode139999en_US
dc.titleInsight from the Public on Home Economics and Formal Food Literacyen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.facultyArts, Education & Law Group, School of Education and Professional Studiesen_US
gro.date.issued2011
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text


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