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dc.contributor.authorKuys, Suzanne
dc.contributor.authorHall, Kathleen
dc.contributor.authorPeasey, Maureen
dc.contributor.authorWood, Michelle
dc.contributor.authorCobb, Robyn
dc.contributor.authorBell, Scott C.
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T11:50:08Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T11:50:08Z
dc.date.issued2011
dc.date.modified2012-02-10T02:59:17Z
dc.identifier.issn1836-9553
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/42185
dc.description.abstractQuestion: Does exercise using a gaming console result in similar cardiovascular demand and energy expenditure as formally prescribed exercise in adults with cystic fibrosis? How do these patients perceive gaming console exercise? Design: Randomised cross-over trial with concealed allocation and intention-to-treat analysis. Participants: 19 adults with cystic fibrosis admitted to hospital for treatment of a pulmonary exacerbation. Intervention: Participants underwent two 15-minute exercise interventions on separate days; one involving a gaming console and one a treadmill or cycle ergometer. Outcome measures: Cardiovascular demand was measured using heart rate and rating of perceived exertion (RPE). Energy expenditure was estimated using a portable activity monitor. Perception (enjoyment, fatigue, workload, effectiveness, feasibility) was rated using a horizontal 10-cm visual analogue scale. Results: There was no significant difference in average heart rate (mean difference 3 beats/min, 95% CI -3 to 9) or energy expenditure (0.1 MET, 95% CI -0.3 to 0.5) between the two interventions. Both interventions provided a 'hard' workout (RPE ~15). Gaming console exercise was rated as more enjoyable (mean difference 2.6 cm, 95% CI 1.6 to 3.6) than formal exercise but they didn't differ significantly in fatigue (-1.0 cm, 95% CI -2.4 to 0.3), perceived effectiveness (-0.4 cm, 95% CI -1.2 to 0.3), or perceived feasibility for inclusion in routine management (0.2 cm, 95% CI -0.7 to 1.1). Conclusion: Gaming console exercise provides a similar cardiovascular demand as traditional exercise modalities. It is feasible that adults with cystic fibrosis could include gaming console exercise in their exercise program. Trial registration: ACTRN12610000861055. [Kuys SS, Hall K, Peasey M, Wood M, Cobb R, Bell SC (2011) Gaming console exercise and cycle or treadmill exercise provide similar cardiovascular demand in adults with cystic fibrosis: a randomised crossover trial. Journal of Physiotherapy 57: 35-40]
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.description.publicationstatusYes
dc.format.extent420794 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherElsevier
dc.publisher.placeAustralia
dc.publisher.urihttps://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1836955311700054
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationN
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom35
dc.relation.ispartofpageto40
dc.relation.ispartofissue1
dc.relation.ispartofjournalJournal of Physiotherapy
dc.relation.ispartofvolume57
dc.rights.retentionY
dc.subject.fieldofresearchMedical and Health Sciences not elsewhere classified
dc.subject.fieldofresearchClinical Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchHuman Movement and Sports Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode119999
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1103
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1106
dc.titleGaming console exercise and cycle or treadmill exercise provide similar cardiovascular demand in adults with cystic fibrosis: a randomised cross-over trial
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
gro.facultyGriffith Health, School of Rehabilitation Sciences
gro.rights.copyright© 2011 Australian Physiotherapy Association. The attached file is reproduced here in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. Please refer to the journal's website for access to the definitive, published version.
gro.date.issued2011
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorKuys, Suzanne S.


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