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dc.contributor.authorEkberg, Jennyen_US
dc.contributor.authorWindus, Louisaen_US
dc.contributor.authorScott, Susanen_US
dc.contributor.authorLineburg, K.en_US
dc.contributor.authorCornock, J.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMackay-Sim, Alanen_US
dc.contributor.authorSt John, Jamesen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T15:26:53Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T15:26:53Z
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.date.modified2012-07-12T23:02:11Z
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/42206
dc.description.abstractImplantation of olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs) or Schwann cells (SCs) into damaged CNS tracts have led to axonal regeneration but the results are not optimal and the favorable glial type may vary depending on the site of injury. Therefore it is crucial to determine how these glial cells interact with neurons so that treatments can be optimised. We have previously shown that OECs display highly motile peripheral membrane protrusions termed lamellipodial waves, which mediate OEC-OEC contacts as well as OEC-axon contacts. Using time lapse imaging of fluorescently labeled cells, we now have investigated the presence of dynamic lamellipodial waves in SCs. The waves were similar to those in OECs in terms of number of waves/cell and wave area but travelled ~2-fold faster. The number of waves and wave area of SCs correlated positively with whole-cell migration rate. Both OECs and SCs interacted directly with DRG axons via lamellipodial waves and selectively migrated along DRG axons rather than on the surrounding substrate. Contact with axons increased the migration rate of glial cells ~2-fold. Finally, both SCs and OECs significantly promoted survival of DRG neurons with survival after 3 days in a nutrient-free medium increasing from 40 % to 67 % by SCs and to 77 % by OECs. In summary, we have demonstrated that SCs exhibit lamellipodial waves, and that contact with axons leads to increased wave activity and increased migration. Both OECs and SCs promoted neuronal survival, suggesting that transplantation of both SCs and OECs may promote regeneration of damaged sensory neurons.en_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_US
dc.format.extent198784 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherNo data provideden_US
dc.publisher.urihttp://www.asbmb.org.au/ozbio2010/en_US
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_US
dc.relation.ispartofconferencenameOzBioen_US
dc.relation.ispartofconferencetitleProceedings of the OzBio 2010 conferenceen_US
dc.relation.ispartofdatefrom2010-09-27en_US
dc.relation.ispartofdateto2010-10-01en_US
dc.relation.ispartoflocationMelbourne, VICen_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchCentral Nervous Systemen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPeripheral Nervous Systemen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode110903en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode110905en_US
dc.titleSchwann cells interact with glial cells and neurons via motile lamellipodial wavesen_US
dc.typeConference outputen_US
dc.type.descriptionE3 - Conference Publications (Extract Paper)en_US
dc.type.codeE - Conference Publicationsen_US
gro.facultyGriffith Sciences, Griffith Institute for Drug Discoveryen_US
gro.rights.copyright© The Author(s) 2010. The attached file is reproduced here in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. For information about this Conference please refer to the Conference website or contact the authors.en_US
gro.date.issued2010
gro.hasfulltextFull Text


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