Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorNeville, J.en_US
dc.contributor.authorJames, D.en_US
dc.contributor.authorRowlands, Daviden_US
dc.contributor.editorA. Sabo, P. Kafka, S. Litzenberger & C. Sabo.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T11:03:52Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T11:03:52Z
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.proeng.2010.04.178en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/42212
dc.description.abstractThe biomechanical processes of a soccer throw-in can be analyzed using a combination of accelerometers and gyroscopes. The biomechanics of a running soccer throw-in have been well studied and it has been established in previous work that the rotation of the distal segments and the torso along with the forward velocity from a running approach contribute to the characteristics of the soccer throw-in. This paper explores the repeatability of the motions of a soccer throw-in along with an examination of the release velocity of the soccer ball and its relationship to the inertial sensor data. Inertial sensor data was recorded at the sacrum and the wrist for a running throw-in. Vicon, a motion capturing system was used to match the motion with the inertial sensor output and determine the release velocities of each soccer throw-in. MATLAB was used to extract the acceleration of the wrist at ball release and to correlate the data provided for multiple trials to determine repeatability. A Pearson's correlation test was conducted for multiple trials from a participant producing minimum correlation coefficients for each of the distinct motions. The minimum correlation coefficient was calculate for the wrist motion (RHO=0.96), the torso rotation (RHO=0.95) and for the body acceleration (RHO=0.85). The release velocity was found to be linear with respect to the wrist acceleration with a correlation coefficient of 0.862. These results demonstrated how inertial sensors can be used to analyze the motions of the soccer throw-in.en_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_US
dc.format.extent94987 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherElsevieren_US
dc.publisher.placeNetherlandsen_US
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_US
dc.relation.ispartofconferencenameThe Engineering of Sport 8 - Engineering Emotionen_US
dc.relation.ispartofconferencetitleProcedia Engineering, Volume 2, Issue 2en_US
dc.relation.ispartofdatefrom2010-07-12en_US
dc.relation.ispartofdateto2010-07-16en_US
dc.relation.ispartoflocationVienna, Austriaen_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue3-4en_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume2en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchHuman Movement and Sports Science not elsewhere classifieden_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode110699en_US
dc.titleAnalyzing the motions of the soccer throw-in using inertial sensorsen_US
dc.typeConference outputen_US
dc.type.descriptionE3 - Conference Publications (Extract Paper)en_US
dc.type.codeE - Conference Publicationsen_US
dcterms.licensehttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/en_US
gro.rights.copyrightCopyright remains with the authors 2010. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported (CC BY-NC-ND 3.0) License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/) which permits unrestricted, non-commercial use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, providing that the work is properly cited. You may not alter, transform, or build upon this work.en_US
gro.date.issued2015-02-26T05:44:52Z
gro.hasfulltextFull Text


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

  • Conference outputs
    Contains papers delivered by Griffith authors at national and international conferences.

Show simple item record