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dc.contributor.authorRowlands, Daviden_US
dc.contributor.authorJames, Danielen_US
dc.contributor.editorA. Sabo, P. Kafka, S. Litzenberger & C. Sabo.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-24T07:54:37Z
dc.date.available2017-04-24T07:54:37Z
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.proeng.2010.04.205en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/42213
dc.description.abstractThe advent of the fully featured iPhone/iPod with its user friendly multitouch user interface, high end graphics display, accelerometers, magnetometers, GPS, WiFi, Bluetooth, and useful processing power means that an off the shelf technology is now readily available for sports monitoring applications. This study determines the suitability of the iPhone/iPod for use in field sports, outlines the architecture used, and then applies the technology to a field sport such as Cricket. A centralised star network was employed using 8GB iPod Touchs connected to a laptop using a wireless access point to allow multiple iPods to connect to the laptop. The subsystems used in the iPods were the WiFi subsystem for connectivity and the accelerometer subsystem for motion measurement. These subsystems exist on both the iPod touch and the iPhone and so this study is relevant to both. An application to stream triaxial accelerometer data over the WiFi to the laptop using UDP was running on the iPod. The software running on the laptop was written in Unix using perl, and gnuplot scripting and was used to collect and display the data in near real time. This method is scalable under Unix as additional instances of the data collection software were launched for each connected iPod. In order to determine the suitability of the iPhone/iPod to measure a field sport, the transmission characteristics of the iPod were measured. These consisted of connectivity with distance and radiation pattern measurements. The results indicated that the iPod can communicate over the distance of a 100 m, and that the orientation of the iPod will not overly affect the communication, and that the body occlusion will reduce the signal strength which could affect the distance of communication. Triaxial accelerometer data for an iPod placed on the upper arm of an amateur bowler in cricket was captured using the iPod. The footsteps in the run up and rotation associated with ball release were able to be seen. Overall this study has shown that it is feasible to use an iPhone/iPod in to monitor athletic performance at the distances required for some field sports.en_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_US
dc.format.extent94912 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherElsevieren_US
dc.publisher.placeNetherlandsen_US
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_US
dc.relation.ispartofconferencenameThe Engineering of Sport 8 - Engineering Emotionen_US
dc.relation.ispartofconferencetitleProcedia Engineering, Volume 2, Issue 2en_US
dc.relation.ispartofdatefrom2010-07-12en_US
dc.relation.ispartofdateto2010-07-16en_US
dc.relation.ispartoflocationVienna, Austriaen_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue3-4en_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume2en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchHuman Movement and Sports Science not elsewhere classifieden_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode110699en_US
dc.titleAn architecture for iPod/iPhone applications in field sportsen_US
dc.typeConference outputen_US
dc.type.descriptionE3 - Conference Publications (Extract Paper)en_US
dc.type.codeE - Conference Publicationsen_US
gro.facultyGriffith Sciences, Griffith School of Engineeringen_US
gro.rights.copyrightCopyright remains with the authors 2010. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported (CC BY-NC-ND 3.0) License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/) which permits unrestricted, non-commercial use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, providing that the work is properly cited. You may not alter, transform, or build upon this work.en_US
gro.date.issued2015-02-26T05:44:55Z
gro.hasfulltextFull Text


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