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dc.contributor.authorGarvis, Susieen_US
dc.contributor.authorPendergast, Donnaen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-04T21:04:17Z
dc.date.available2017-04-04T21:04:17Z
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.date.modified2012-02-10T01:08:26Z
dc.identifier.issn15298094en_US
dc.identifier.doihttp://www.ijea.org/v12n9/index.htmlen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/42266
dc.description.abstractThe self-efficacy beliefs teachers hold about their ability to teach subjects shapes their competence in teaching. Teacher self-efficacy is defined as teacher beliefs in their ability to perform a teaching task. If teachers have strong teacher self-efficacy in the teaching of arts education, they are more likely to incorporate arts in the classroom. Alternatively, if teachers have weak teacher self-efficacy in the teaching of arts education they are less likely to include aspects of the arts in their curriculum. Little is known about teacher self-efficacy beliefs towards arts education in early childhood education. Since arts education is an important element in the curriculum of any classroom - including all early childhood classrooms - investigation of the beliefs that shape teacher practice is desirable. In 2010, a survey was distributed using convenience sampling to early childhood teachers throughout Queensland. There were 21 respondents, representing a response rate of 27%. Each completed an adapted version of the Teachers' Sense of Efficacy Scale for Arts Education. Perceived competence towards each of the five arts strands (dance, drama, media, visual arts and music) were compared to perceived competence in maths and English. The number of hours taught in each of the arts strands was also investigated. Findings suggest all of the respondent early childhood teachers had greater perceived competence for teaching maths and English compared to any of the arts strands. Some early childhood teachers did not engage with some of the arts strands (particularly drama, dance, media) in their daily classrooms. These findings provide glimpses of the current day-to-day running of early childhood classrooms and the role of arts education in the current climate of policy reform and accountability.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_US
dc.format.extent146369 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherArizona State Universityen_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_US
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom1en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto15en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalInternational Journal of Education & the Artsen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume12en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchCreative Arts, Media and Communication Curriculum and Pedagogyen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode130201en_US
dc.titleAn Investigation of Early Childhood Teacher Self-Efficacy Beliefs in the Teaching of Arts Educationen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.facultyArts, Education & Law Group, School of Education and Professional Studiesen_US
gro.rights.copyrightCopyright 2011 IJEA. The attached file is reproduced here in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. Please refer to the journal's website for access to the definitive, published version.en_US
gro.date.issued2011
gro.hasfulltextFull Text


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