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dc.contributor.authorCumming, Janeten_US
dc.contributor.authorHawker, Darrylen_US
dc.contributor.authorChapman, Heatheren_US
dc.contributor.authorNugent, Kerryen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T11:24:35Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T11:24:35Z
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.date.modified2012-03-29T04:58:16Z
dc.identifier.issn00496979en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s11270-010-0543-5en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/42283
dc.description.abstractPolymeric quaternary ammonium salts or polyquaterniums used in cosmetics have been categorised as chemicals of concern in wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) effluent largely on the basis of emerging evidence of toxicity to aquatic organisms. However, little is known of their environmental fate and behaviour due to analytical difficulties with sample matrices. Their properties of negligible volatilisation and biotransformation enable the common fugacity-based model for WWTPs to be simplified to an equifugacity one where a compound has the same fugacity regardless of phase or position in the plant's process train. To gain an appreciation of their fate, this approach is used to calculate removal efficiencies in WWTPs. These can be determined without calculating phase-specific fugacity capacity constants. To predict effluent concentrations however, an aquivalence approach is necessary because of the lack of volatility of these compounds. Using previously measured biosolids/water distribution coefficients for common polyquaterniums found in cosmetics and flow rate data from a local municipal WWTP in South East Queensland, Australia, the removal efficiencies of the polyquaterniums of interest are predicted to be only 25% or less, meaning relatively little attenuation in the WWTP. A Monte Carlo simulation shows a roughly normal distribution in the model output of polyquaternium removal efficiency, with a mean and mode of approximately 26%. A sensitivity analysis confirms that the model output is most sensitive to the magnitude of the biosolids/water distribution coefficient compound and shows WWTP data such as biosolids removal efficiency have only a relatively small effect.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_US
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherSpringer Netherlandsen_US
dc.publisher.placeNetherlandsen_US
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_US
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom441en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto450en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue1-4en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalWater, Air and Soil Pollutionen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume216en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchEnvironmental Chemistry (incl. Atmospheric Chemistry)en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode039901en_US
dc.titleThe Fate of Polymeric Quaternary Ammonium Salts from Cosmetics in Wastewater Treatment Plantsen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.facultyGriffith Sciences, Griffith School of Environmenten_US
gro.date.issued2011
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text


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