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dc.contributor.authorByrne, Jasonen_US
dc.contributor.editorGavin Bridge & Scott Prudhamen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T15:10:59Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T15:10:59Z
dc.date.issued2012en_US
dc.date.modified2014-08-28T05:05:42Z
dc.identifier.issn0016-7185en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.geoforum.2011.10.002en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/42417
dc.description.abstractScholars have attributed park (non)use, especially ethno-racially differentiated (non)use, to various factors, including socio-cultural (e.g. poverty, cultural preferences, etc.) and socio-spatial determinants (e.g. travel distance, park features, etc.). But new geographic research is proposing alternative explanations for park (non)use, employing a 'cultural politics' theoretical lens. The cultural politics frame offers fresh insights into how practices of socio-ecological exclusion and attachment in parks may be undergirded by political struggles over the making and ordering of racialized identities. Challenging partial and essentialist explanations from leisure research, some cultural politics scholars have recently argued that ethno-racial formations, cultural histories of park-making (e.g. segregated park systems), and land-use systems (e.g. zoning and property taxes) can operate to circumscribe park access and use for some people of color. Using the cultural politics frame, this paper documents the ethno-racial and nativist barriers Latino focus group participants faced in accessing and using some Los Angeles parks. Participants reported feeling 'out of place', 'unwelcome' or excluded from these parks. They identified the predominantly White clientele of parks; the ethno-racial profile of park-adjacent neighborhoods; a lack of Spanish-language signs; fears of persecution; and direct experiences of discrimination as exclusionary factors. These findings have implications for future research and for park planning and management.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_US
dc.format.extent175812 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherElsevieren_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_US
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom595en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto611en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue3en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalGeoforumen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume43en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchSocial and Cultural Geographyen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchHistory and Theory of the Built Environment (excl. Architecture)en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchRecreation, Leisure and Tourism Geographyen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode160403en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode120502en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode160402en_US
dc.titleWhen green is White: The cultural politics of race, nature and social exclusion in a Los Angeles urban national parken_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.facultyGriffith Sciences, Griffith School of Environmenten_US
gro.rights.copyrightCopyright 2011 Elsevier. This is the author-manuscript version of this paper. Reproduced in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. Please refer to the journal's website for access to the definitive, published version.en_US
gro.date.issued2012
gro.hasfulltextFull Text


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