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dc.contributor.authorCleland, Heather
dc.contributor.authorProud, David
dc.contributor.authorSpinks, Anneliese
dc.contributor.authorWasiak, Jason
dc.date.accessioned2018-05-08T23:09:43Z
dc.date.available2018-05-08T23:09:43Z
dc.date.issued2011
dc.date.modified2012-02-16T05:38:53Z
dc.identifier.issn0025729X
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/42814
dc.description.abstractObjectives: To describe the characteristics of patients with burn injury admitted to a major trauma hospital in Melbourne following the Black Saturday bushfires of 7 February 2009, and to provide a detailed analysis of the hospital's response to the crisis. Design, setting and participants: A retrospective chart review of ambulance and hospital records of patients admitted to the Victorian Adult Burns Service (VABS) at The Alfred Hospital (The Alfred) following the bushfires. Main outcome measures: Patient characteristics and outcomes: age, sex, total and full thickness body surface area burnt, type and site of burn, hospital and intensive care unit length of stay (LOS) and receipt of standard burn care practices. Estimated glomerular filtration rate, theatre time and LOS data for the bushfire cohort compared with corresponding data for historical cohorts from VABS and from a similar institution in New Zealand. Results: Nineteen patients were admitted to VABS over the first 48 hours after the bushfires. Of these, nine patients were subsequently admitted to The Alfred's intensive care unit. Most patients (74%) were men with a mean age of 52.7 years (SD, 12.4 years). Seventeen patients (89%) underwent at least one surgical procedure, which resulted in 4355 minutes of theatre time for the bushfire cohort in the first week. Hospital LOS was similar for the bushfire and New Zealand cohorts. Compared with the VABS historical cohort, there was a higher incidence of abnormal renal function among the bushfire cohort patients. Conclusions: Although relatively few patients with severe burns were admitted to VABS, significant increases in resource allocation were required to manage them in terms of additional theatre time, consumables and staffing. The experience of VABS may aid MJA 2011; 194: 589-593 planning for future mass burns casualty events.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.description.publicationstatusYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherAustralasian Medical Publishing Company Pty Ltd
dc.publisher.placeAustralia
dc.publisher.urihttps://www.mja.com.au/journal/2011/194/11/multidisciplinary-team-response-mass-burn-casualty-event-outcomes-and
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationN
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom589
dc.relation.ispartofpageto593
dc.relation.ispartofissue11
dc.relation.ispartofjournalMedical Journal of Australia
dc.relation.ispartofvolume194
dc.rights.retentionY
dc.subject.fieldofresearchMedical and Health Sciences not elsewhere classified
dc.subject.fieldofresearchMedical and Health Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPsychology and Cognitive Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode119999
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode11
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode17
dc.titleMultidisciplinary team response to a mass burn casualty event: outcomes and implications
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
dc.description.versionPublished
gro.rights.copyrightCleland HJ, Proud D, Spinks A and Wasiak J. Multidisciplinary team response to a mass burn casualty event: outcomes and implications. Med J Aust 2011; 194 (11): 589-593. © Copyright 2011 The Medical Journal of Australia – reproduced with permission.
gro.date.issued2011
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorSpinks, Anneliese B.


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