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dc.contributor.authorAshton, Louiseen_US
dc.contributor.authorKitching, Rogeren_US
dc.contributor.authorMaunsell, Sarahen_US
dc.contributor.authorBito, Darrenen_US
dc.contributor.authorPutland, Daviden_US
dc.contributor.editorChris J. Burwell, Akihiro Nakamura, Roger L. Kitchingen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T14:09:14Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T14:09:14Z
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.date.modified2013-05-14T01:29:01Z
dc.identifier.issn00798835en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/42838
dc.description.abstractMoth assemblages have been widely used to estimate patterns of beta-diversity in forest ecosystems. As part of the IBISCA-Queensland project we examined patterns of diversity in a large subset of night-flying moths along an altitudinal gradient in subtropical rainforest. The permanent IBISCA-Queensland transect located in Lamington National Park, south-east Queensland, Australia, spans altitudes from 300 metres (m) to 1100 m above sea level (a.s.l.) within continuous, undisturbed rainforest. We sampled four replicate plots at each of five altitudes (300, 500, 700, 900, 1100 m a.s.l.). A total of 11 379 individual moths were sampled, belonging to approximately 865 morphospecies. Moth assemblages displayed a strong altitudinal signal at each of two sampling periods (October 2006 and March 2007). The results show that cloud forest above 900 m a.s.l. where Nothofagus moorei becomes dominant, contains a number of moth species that are restricted to the high elevation forest and these species may be most threatened by climatic change. The analyses presented here suggest a set of 18 moth species which may be useful as part of a multi-taxon predictor set for future monitoring of the impact of global warming on forest biodiversity. ? climate change, subtropical, rainforest, IBISCAen_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_US
dc.format.extent2525743 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherQueensland Museumen_US
dc.publisher.placeAustraliaen_US
dc.publisher.urihttp://www.qm.qld.gov.au/About+Us/Publications/Memoirs+of+the+Queensland+Museumen_US
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationYen_US
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom375en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto389en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue2en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalMemoirs of the Queensland Museumen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume55en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchEcological Impacts of Climate Changeen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode050101en_US
dc.titleMacrolepidopteran assemblages along an altitudinal gradient in subtropical rainforest - exploring indicators of climate changeen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.facultyGriffith Sciences, Griffith School of Environmenten_US
gro.rights.copyrightCopyright 2011 Queensland Museum. The attached file is reproduced here in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. Please refer to the journal's website for access to the definitive, published version.en_US
gro.date.issued2011
gro.hasfulltextFull Text


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