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dc.contributor.authorFord, Marilynen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-04T14:25:43Z
dc.date.available2017-04-04T14:25:43Z
dc.date.issued2005en_US
dc.date.modified2010-08-20T06:28:08Z
dc.identifier.issn00397857en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s11229-005-9071-zen_AU
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/4285
dc.description.abstractThree studies of human nonmonotonic reasoning are described. The results show that people find such reasoning quite difficult, although being given problems with known subclass-superclass relationships is helpful. The results also show that recognizing differences in the logical strengths of arguments is important for the nonmonotonic problems studied. For some of these problems, specificity - which is traditionally considered paramount in drawing appropriate conclusions - was irrelevant and so should have lead to a "can't tell" response; however, people could give rational conclusions based on differences in the logical consequences of arguments. The same strategy also works for problems where specificity is relevant, suggesting that in fact specificity is not paramount. Finally, results showed that subjects' success at responding appropriately to nonmonotonic problems involving conflict relies heavily on the ability to appreciate differences in the logical strength of simple, non-conflicting, statements.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_AU
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherSpringeren_US
dc.publisher.placeNetherlandsen_US
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom71en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto92en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue1-2en_AU
dc.relation.ispartofjournalSyntheseen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume146en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_AU
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode380305en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode389999en_US
dc.titleHuman nonmonotonic reasoning: the importance of seeing the logical strength of argumentsen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.facultyGriffith Sciences, School of Information and Communication Technologyen_US
gro.date.issued2005
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text


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