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dc.contributor.authorLeys, Johnen_US
dc.contributor.authorMcTainsh, Granten_US
dc.contributor.authorKoen, Terryen_US
dc.contributor.authorMooney, Brianen_US
dc.contributor.authorStrong, Craigen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-24T08:15:23Z
dc.date.available2017-04-24T08:15:23Z
dc.date.issued2005en_US
dc.date.modified2009-10-01T05:55:59Z
dc.identifier.issn01979337en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/esp.1159en_AU
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/4319
dc.description.abstractThis paper describes a series of tests designed to evaluate the capacity of a personal computer (PC) based statistical curve-fitting program called MIX to quantify composite populations within multi-modal particle-size distributions. Three natural soil samples were analysed by a Coulter Multisizer, and their particle-size distributions analysed using MIX software to identify the modes, standard deviations and proportions of their composite populations. The particle-size distributions of the three natural soil samples were then numerically combined in equal proportions using a spreadsheet program to create synthetic particle-size distributions of known populations. MIX was then tested on the synthetic particle-size distributions to see if the modes and proportions it identified were similar to those modes and proportions known to characterize the synthetic particle-size distributions. The main outcome is that MIX can very accurately describe the modal particle size and proportions of the major composite populations within a particle-size distribution. However MIX has difficulty in identifying small populations (those contributing <10 per cent of a total particle-size distribution), particularly when they are located in the central sections of particle-size distributions, overlain by larger populations, or when positioned in the fine tails of distributions. Despite these minor shortcomings, MIX is a valuable tool for the examination and interpretation of particle-size data.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_AU
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sons Ltd.en_US
dc.publisher.placeUKen_US
dc.publisher.urihttp://www3.interscience.wiley.com/journal/117935722/grouphome/home.htmlen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom579en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto590en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalEarth Surface Processes and Landformsen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume30en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_AU
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode269901en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode260114en_US
dc.titleTesting a statistical curve-fitting procedure for quantifying sediment populations within multi-modal particle-size distributionsen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.rights.copyrightCopyright 2005 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Self-archiving of the author-manuscript version is not yet supported by this publisher. Please refer to the journal link for access to the definitive, published version or contact the author for more information.en_AU
gro.date.issued2005
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text


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