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dc.contributor.authorElias, Juanitaen_US
dc.contributor.editorShaun Breslin, Richard Higgott, Christopher Hughesen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T15:48:54Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T15:48:54Z
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.date.modified2012-03-01T22:15:07Z
dc.identifier.issn09512748en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/09512748.2011.596564en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/43233
dc.description.abstractMany academic commentators have pointed to how the widening and deepening of a neoliberal reform agenda in Southeast Asia has brought about the end of developmental forms of state governance and the emergence of less directly market interventionist states pursuing economic 'competitiveness'. In this paper, I note how notions of competitiveness are increasingly fused with ideas regarding the contribution of gender equity and women's empowerment to national economic success. However, drawing upon a case study of Malaysia, this paper highlights how government policies stressing both the marketisation of social reproduction and the need to expand women's productive roles are constantly brought into tension with embedded social structures. Such an emphasis is essential to any understanding of the role of the Malaysian state in economic development - a role that has been fundamentally shaped by a localised politics of ethnicity. The paper draws upon examples from government policy-making that conceptualise women as key workers in the emerging knowledge-driven economy and as microentrepreneurs driving pro-poor economic growth and illustrates how such policies are brought into tension with traditionalist discourses concerning the appropriate role of women in society.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_US
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.publisherRoutledgeen_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_US
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom529en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto552en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue5en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalThe Pacific Reviewen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume24en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchGovernment and Politics of Asia and the Pacificen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode160606en_US
dc.titleThe gender politics of economic competitiveness in Malaysia's transition to a knowledge economyen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.facultyGriffith Business School, Department of International Business and Asian Studiesen_US
gro.date.issued2011
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text


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