Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorBurke, Matthewen_US
dc.contributor.authorLi, Terryen_US
dc.contributor.authorDodson, Jagoen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T13:19:59Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T13:19:59Z
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.date.modified2012-03-06T05:45:31Z
dc.identifier.issn03611981en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.3141/2255-12en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/43324
dc.description.abstractWhat are the transport effects of government office decentralization policies in cities with strong mono-centric structures? Decentralization may be defined as the process by which city-regions increase the proportion of jobs that are located outside of their central business district (CBD) and its immediate frame. There is a resurgence of state-led decentralization activity in Australia, with governments promising to move 20% of all city center public servants out to middle- and outer-suburban locations in two of the largest cities, Perth and Brisbane, within a decade. Yet the transport impacts of these policies have not been assessed or meaningfully considered by government. Two key research activities are reported on to address this research gap. An extensive review of previous modeling and travel behavior studies on mono- vs. poly-centric urban structures and of workplace relocation programs is summarized. This highlights mixed results for the transport sector, and identifies possible research paths to identify impacts for cities where decentralization is proposed. This leads to a large modeling effort using the multi-modal Brisbane Strategic Transport Model, examining the likely impacts under specific decentralization scenarios for Greater Brisbane. Results are provided in terms of modal shares, vehicle kilometers travelled, travel time, levels of service on key links and transit patronage. The type of decentralization policy selected has effects on reverse commuting and transit use. The results suggest only those policies directing employment to key rail and busway nodes will mitigate potentially adverse impacts.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_US
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.publisherTransportation Research Boarden_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_US
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom110en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto116en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue2255en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalTransportation Research Recorden_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume2en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchUrban Analysis and Developmenten_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchTransport Planningen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode120507en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode120506en_US
dc.titleWhat Happens When Government Workers Move to the Suburbs? Impact on Transport of Planned Decentralization of Employment in Brisbane, Australiaen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.facultyGriffith Sciences, Griffith School of Environmenten_US
gro.rights.copyrightSelf-archiving of the author-manuscript version is not yet supported by this journal. Please refer to the journal link for access to the definitive, published version or contact the authors for more information.en_US
gro.date.issued2011
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text


Files in this item

FilesSizeFormatView

There are no files associated with this item.

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

  • Journal articles
    Contains articles published by Griffith authors in scholarly journals.

Show simple item record