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dc.contributor.authorKelly, Adrian B
dc.contributor.authorChan, Gary CK
dc.contributor.authorToumbourou, John W
dc.contributor.authorO'Flaherty, Martin
dc.contributor.authorHomel, Ross
dc.contributor.authorPatton, George C
dc.contributor.authorWilliams, Joanne
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T12:10:06Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T12:10:06Z
dc.date.issued2012
dc.date.modified2014-08-28T05:05:44Z
dc.identifier.issn0306-4603
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.addbeh.2011.11.038
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/43348
dc.description.abstractAim: The aim of this study is to examine the susceptibility of very young adolescents (10-12 years of age) to 26 peer alcohol-related influences, compared to older adolescents (13-14 years of age). 27 Methods: The analysis sample consisted of 7064 adolescents in grade 6 (modal age 11) or grade 8 (modal 28 age 13) from 231 schools in 30 communities across three Australian States. Key measures were adolescent 29 reports of alcohol use (past 30 days) and the number of peers who consume alcohol without their parent's 30 awareness. Control variables included parent alcohol use, family relationship quality, pubertal advancement, 31 school connectedness, sensation seeking, depression, length of time in high school, as well as age, gender, 32 father/mother education, and language spoken at home. A multi-level model of alcohol use was used to ac- 33 count for school-level clustering on the dependent variable. 34 Results: For both groups, the number of peers who consumed alcohol was associated with alcohol use, but 35 Grade 6 students showed a unique susceptibility to peripheral involvement with peer drinking networks 36 (having one friend who consumed alcohol). 37 Conclusion: The results point to the importance of monitoring and responding to comparatively minor shifts 38 in the proportion of peers who use alcohol, particularly among very young adolescents.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.description.publicationstatusYes
dc.format.extent517820 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherElsevier
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationN
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom414
dc.relation.ispartofpageto419
dc.relation.ispartofissue4
dc.relation.ispartofjournalAddictive Behaviors
dc.relation.ispartofvolume37
dc.rights.retentionY
dc.subject.fieldofresearchCommunity Child Health
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPublic Health and Health Services
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPsychology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode111704
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1117
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1701
dc.titleVery young adolescents and alcohol: Evidence of a unique susceptibility to peer alcohol use
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
gro.rights.copyright© 2011 Elsevier. This is the author-manuscript version of this paper. Reproduced in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. Please refer to the journal's website for access to the definitive, published version.
gro.date.issued2012
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorHomel, Ross J.
gro.griffith.authorKelly, Adrian B.


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