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dc.contributor.authorB. Kelly, Adrianen_US
dc.contributor.authorConnor, Jason P.en_US
dc.contributor.authorHomel, Rossen_US
dc.contributor.authorO'Flaherty, Martinen_US
dc.contributor.authorPatton, Georgeen_US
dc.contributor.authorW. Toumbourou, Johnen_US
dc.contributor.authorWilliams, Joanneen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-04T15:48:09Z
dc.date.available2017-04-04T15:48:09Z
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.date.modified2013-06-25T00:11:31Z
dc.identifier.issn1937-1888en_US
dc.identifier.doihttp://www.jsad.com/jsad/article/Family_Relationship_Quality_and_Early_Alcohol_Use_Evidence_for_GenderSpec/4571.htmlen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/43350
dc.description.abstractObjective: Family characteristics (relationship quality, parental behaviors, and attitudes relating to alcohol use) are known to influence alcohol use in the mid-teen years, and there is evidence that family characteristics have different influences on mid-teen girls versus boys. This study examined child gender differences in the association of family relationship quality, parental disapproval of children's alcohol use, and parental alcohol use with early adolescent alcohol use. Method: Grade 6 and 8 students (modal age 11 and 13, respectively; N = 6,837; 52.6% female) were recruited from 231 schools across three Australian states. Hypotheses were tested using two-level ordinal logistic regression (individuals nested within schools). The main dependent measure was lifetime frequency of early adolescent alcohol consumption. Independent variables included mother's/father's alcohol use, closeness, conflict, and disapproval of adolescent alcohol use. Control variables included sensation seeking, peer alcohol use, and socioeconomic disadvantage. Results: The key findings were that for the young age group (Grade 6), emotional closeness to the parent of the opposite sex was protective. Family conflict was associated with females' drinking in both age groups but not males' drinking. Conclusions: There was evidence of gender differences in the epidemiology of family relationship quality and early alcohol use. Social developmental models may need revision to account for these child gender differences. Gender-specific family dynamics may be an important consideration for family-oriented prevention strategy.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_US
dc.format.extent4122915 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherAlcohol Research Documentationen_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.publisher.urihttp://www.jsad.com/en_US
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_US
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom399en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto407en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue3en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalJournal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugsen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume72en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchDevelopmental Psychology and Ageingen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode170102en_US
dc.titleFamily relationship quality and early alcohol use: Evidence for gender-specific risk processesen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.rights.copyrightCopyright 2011 Center of Alcohol Studies. The attached file is reproduced here in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. Please refer to the journal's website for access to the definitive, published version.en_US
gro.date.issued2011
gro.hasfulltextFull Text


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