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dc.contributor.authorBurton, Bruceen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T12:46:54Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T12:46:54Z
dc.date.issued2012en_US
dc.date.modified2014-08-28T05:05:39Z
dc.identifier.issn0311-6999en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s13384-011-0046-4en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/43363
dc.description.abstractThis article reports on a major action research program that experimented with the use of cross-age peer teaching in schools to assist teachers to manage con?ict issues in their classrooms, and to re-engage disaffected students in learning. The research, which was conducted in a range of elementary and secondary schools in Australia, was part of a larger international project using con?ict resolution concepts and techniques combined with drama strategies to address cultural con?ict in schools. The use of formal cross-age peer teaching emerged as a highly effective strategy in teaching students to manage a range of con?icts in schools, and especially in learning to deal with bullying. Operating as peer teachers also enabled a number of students in the study, with serious behaviour problems, to re-engage with their learning. The article therefore evaluates the effectiveness of peer teaching in both con?ict management and student re-engagement.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_US
dc.format.extent91157 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherSpringeren_US
dc.publisher.placeNetherlandsen_US
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_US
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom45en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto58en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue1en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalAER: The Australian Educational Researcheren_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume39en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchCurriculum and Pedagogy Theory and Developmenten_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode130202en_US
dc.titlePeer teaching as a strategy for conflict management and student re-engagement in schoolsen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.rights.copyrightCopyright 2011 Australian Association for Research in Education . This is the author-manuscript version of this paper. Reproduced in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. Please refer to the journal website for access to the definitive, published version.en_US
gro.date.issued2012
gro.hasfulltextFull Text


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