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dc.contributor.authorHayward, W.en_US
dc.contributor.authorHaseler, Lukeen_US
dc.contributor.authorKettwich, L.en_US
dc.contributor.authorichael, A.en_US
dc.contributor.authorSibbitt Jr, W.en_US
dc.contributor.authorBankhurst, A.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T13:12:15Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T13:12:15Z
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.identifier.issn03009742en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.3109/03009742.2011.560892en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/43497
dc.description.abstractObjective: Hydrodissection and high-pressure injection are important for the treatment of dense connective tissue lesions including rheumatoid nodules, Dupuytren's contracture, and trigger finger. The present study determined the optimal syringes for high-pressure injection of dense connective tissue lesions. Methods: Different sizes (1, 3, 5, 10, 20, and 60 mL) of a mechanical syringe (reciprocating procedure device) with a luerlock fitting were studied. Twenty operators generated maximum pressure with each mechanical syringe size, and pressure was measured in pounds per square inch (psi). Subsequently, 223 dense connective tissue lesions were injected with different sizes of syringes (1, 3, or 10 mL). Outcomes included (i) successful intralesional injection and (ii) clinical response at 2 weeks. Results: Smaller syringes generated significantly more injection pressure than did larger syringes: 1 mL (363 197 psi), 3 mL (177 96 psi), 5 mL (73 40 psi), 10 mL (53 29 psi), 20 mL (32 18 psi), and 60 mL (19 12 psi). Similarly, smaller syringes were superior to larger syringes for intralesional injection success: 10 mL: 34% (15/44) vs. 1 mL: 100% (70/70) (p < 0.001) and 3 mL: 91% (99/109) (p < 0.001). Conclusion: Smaller syringes ( 3 mL) are superior to larger syringes ( 5 mL) for successful hydrodissection and highpressure intralesional injection of dense connective tissue lesions.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_US
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherInforma Healthcareen_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_US
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom379en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto382en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue5en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalScandinavian Journal of Rheumatologyen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume40en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchCardiovascular Medicine and Haematology not elsewhere classifieden_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode110299en_US
dc.titlePressure generated by syringes: implications for hydrodissection and injection of dense connective tissue lesionsen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.date.issued2015-05-31T22:18:06Z
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text


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