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dc.contributor.authorGabric, Alberten_US
dc.contributor.authorShephard, Jillen_US
dc.contributor.authorKnight, Jonen_US
dc.contributor.authorJones, Grahamen_US
dc.contributor.authorJ. Trevena, Anneen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T11:27:39Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T11:27:39Z
dc.date.issued2005en_US
dc.date.modified2011-03-04T03:15:48Z
dc.identifier.issn08866236en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1029/2005GB002546en_AU
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/4350
dc.description.abstractThe relationship between the production of dimethylsulfide (DMS) in the upper ocean and atmospheric sulfate aerosols has been confirmed through local shipboard measurements, and global modeling studies alike. In order to examine whether such a connection may be recoverable in the satellite record, we have analyzed the correlation between mean surface chlorophyll (CHL) and aerosol optical depth (AOD) in the Southern Ocean, where the marine atmosphere is relatively remote from anthropogenic and continental influences. We carried out the analysis in 5-degree zonal bands between 50Ӡand 70Ӭ for the period (1997-2004), and in smaller meridional sectors in the Eastern Antarctic, Ross and Weddell seas. Seasonality is moderate to strong in both CHL and AOD signatures throughout the study regions. Coherence in the CHL and AOD time series is strong in the band between 50Ӡand 60Ӭ however this synchrony is absent in the sea-ice zone (SIZ) south of 60Ӯ Marked interannual variability in CHL occurs south of 60Ӭ presumably related to variability in sea-ice production during the previous winter. We find a clear latitudinal difference in the cross correlation between CHL and AOD, with the AOD peak preceding the CHL bloom by up to 6 weeks in the SIZ. This suggests that substantial trace gas emissions (aerosol precursors) are being produced over the SIZ in spring (October-December) as sea ice melts. This hypothesis is supported by field data that record extremely high levels of sulfur species in sea ice, surface seawater, and the overlying atmosphere during ice melt.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_AU
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherAmerican Geophysical Unionen_US
dc.publisher.placeWashington DC, USAen_US
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom1en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto10en_US
dc.relation.ispartofeditionGB4018en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue4en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalGlobal Biogeochemical Cyclesen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume19en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_AU
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode269999en_US
dc.titleCorrelations between the satellite-derived seasonal cycles of phytoplankton biomass and aerosol optical depth in the Southern Ocean: Eivdence for the influence of sea iceen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.facultyGriffith Sciences, Griffith School of Environmenten_US
gro.rights.copyrightCopyright 2005 American Geophysical Union. Reproduced in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. This journal is available online: use hypertext links.en_AU
gro.date.issued2005
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text


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