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dc.contributor.authorAlizadeh Fard, Tooranen_US
dc.contributor.authorSipe, Neilen_US
dc.contributor.authorDodson, Jagoen_US
dc.contributor.editorCarolyn Whitzmanen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T16:02:42Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T16:02:42Z
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.date.modified2012-08-13T22:42:25Z
dc.identifier.refurihttp://soac2011.com.auen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/43549
dc.description.abstractThe Australian government is currently constructing a National Broadband Network (NBN), which at an estimated cost of $43 billion will be Australia's largest ever infrastructure project. The NBN, if its full benefits are to be realized, raises a number of important but to date largely unexplored questions for planning in Australia. This paper investigates the implications of the NBN for Australian metropolitan planning, and the extent and quality of current metropolitan planning in recognizing, planning for, and exploiting the NBN to improve urban outcomes in Australian cities. The paper focuses on the Sydney and Brisbane metropolitan areas, and analyzes the major strategic and policy documents shaping the future of these regions during the rollout and post construction periods of the NBN. Sydney's metropolitan strategic documents strongly assert its global position and seek a fair distribution of resources at the local scale. Brisbane, in contrast, is the heart of Australia's fastest growing region (South East Queensland) where metro-regional planning is assisting to facilitate and guide urban growth. A comparative analysis of the strategies and policies for Sydney and Brisbane reveals similarities in their weak stance towards the NBN and telecommunications generally. Some key findings include: a segregation of infrastructure planning and metropolitan planning; a lack of consistency between different policies within each metropolitan area; and policy gaps regarding the role of telecommunications at the metropolitan level. Considering the large size of the NBN investment, this paper is appropriately timed and addresses policy issues that will impact upon future metropolitan planning in Australia.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_US
dc.format.extent210530 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherState of Australian Cities National Conferenceen_US
dc.publisher.placeMelbourne, Australiaen_US
dc.publisher.urihttp://soac.fbe.unsw.edu.au/2011/welcome.htmlen_US
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_US
dc.relation.ispartofconferencenameSOAC 2011en_US
dc.relation.ispartofconferencetitleState of Australian Cities National Conference 2011en_US
dc.relation.ispartofdatefrom2011-11-29en_US
dc.relation.ispartofdateto2011-12-02en_US
dc.relation.ispartoflocationMelbourne, Australiaen_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchLand Use and Environmental Planningen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchUrban Policyen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode120504en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode160514en_US
dc.titleMetropolitan Planning and NBN: A comparative policy analysis, Sydney vs. Brisbaneen_US
dc.typeConference outputen_US
dc.type.descriptionE1 - Conference Publications (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeE - Conference Publicationsen_US
gro.facultyGriffith Sciences, Griffith School of Environmenten_US
gro.rights.copyrightCopyright remains with the authors 2011. The attached file is reproduced here in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. For information about this conference please refer to the conference’s website or contact the authors.en_US
gro.date.issued2011
gro.hasfulltextFull Text


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    Contains papers delivered by Griffith authors at national and international conferences.

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