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dc.contributor.convenorFelix Chanen_US
dc.contributor.authorEl Hanandeh, Alien_US
dc.contributor.editorChan, F., Marinova, D. and Anderssen, R. S.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-24T13:38:43Z
dc.date.available2017-04-24T13:38:43Z
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.date.modified2012-03-12T05:31:05Z
dc.identifier.refuriwww.mssanz.org.au/modsim2011en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/43551
dc.description.abstractAbstract: The olive oil industry in Australia has been growing at a rapid rate over the past decade. This growth brings along with it new challenges. The solid waste, produced from the olive oil mills, is particularly difficult to manage. Pyrolysis is a process which may be employed to generate biochar, bio-oil and gas from biomass. The proportions and in fact the quality of the different products depend on the process parameters such as final temperature, heating rate, particle size and pyrolysis method. The change in the products quantities and qualities affect the potential revenue from the sale of these products as well as the potential environmental credits due to the altered use and or product properties. This paper investigates some of the economic and environmental trade-offs in the production and end-use of the biochar and bio-oil from the olive-oil solid waste in Australia. Special attention is paid to the impact of policies such as renewable energy targets, carbon tax and carbon sequestration credits on agricultural lands. Under the current government policies, the optimal utilisation of the pyrolysis products is limited due to the lack of incentives for the use of bio-char as a soil amendment on agricultural soils. Keywords: pyrolysis; olive husk; bio-oil; biochar; carbon sequestration; carbon taxen_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_US
dc.format.extent1031710 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.publisherModelling and Simulation Society of Australia and New Zealand,en_US
dc.publisher.placeAustraliaen_US
dc.publisher.urihttp://www.mssanz.org.au/modsim2011/index.htmen_US
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_US
dc.relation.ispartofconferencename19th International Congress on Modelling and Simulation (MODSIM 2011)en_US
dc.relation.ispartofconferencetitleMODSIM2011 Proceedings. Sustaining our future: understanding and living with uncertaintyen_US
dc.relation.ispartofdatefrom2011-12-12en_US
dc.relation.ispartofdateto2011-12-16en_US
dc.relation.ispartoflocationPerth, Australiaen_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchEnvironmental Engineering Modellingen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode090702en_US
dc.titleTrade-offs in the production and end-use of biochar and bio-oil from the solid waste generated from the olive oil industry in Australiaen_US
dc.typeConference outputen_US
dc.type.descriptionE1 - Conference Publications (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeE - Conference Publicationsen_US
gro.facultyGriffith Sciences, Griffith School of Engineeringen_US
gro.rights.copyrightCopyright 2011 Modellling & Simulation Society of Australia & New Zealand. The attached file is reproduced here in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. For information about this conference please refer to the conference’s website or contact the author[s].en_US
gro.date.issued2011
gro.hasfulltextFull Text


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