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dc.contributor.convenorCurtin Universityen_US
dc.contributor.authorPanuwatwanich, Kriengsaken_US
dc.contributor.authorStewart, Rodneyen_US
dc.contributor.authorNepal, Kali Prasaden_US
dc.contributor.editorA/Prof Euan Lindsay and Dr Yasir M. Al-Abdelien_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-24T12:28:08Z
dc.date.available2017-04-24T12:28:08Z
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.date.modified2012-03-14T05:22:09Z
dc.identifier.refuriwww.aaee.com.au/en_US
dc.identifier.doihttp://www.aaee.com.au/conferences/2011/en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/43563
dc.description.abstractIt is well established that projects play an important part in all engineering sectors and successful projects require effective project management (PM). For professional engineers in Australia, PM forms part of a standard competency specified by Engineers Australia. It has also become a standard component of engineering programs offered at most Australian universities. Nonetheless, there are not enough studies on specific project management skills, which engineering graduates are expected to learn and effectively apply in a project work environment, to help deliver a better targeted and more relevant project management course. The main aim of this research is thus to identify essential PM knowledge areas that engineering graduates require in their early career, with the outcomes expected to provide implications on the design of engineering project management (EPM) courses. The research was achieved through an online survey, which seeks input from industry practitioners and was partly developed using the details of PM knowledge areas provided in the Guide to the Project Management Body of Knowledge. The results from the survey of 30 practitioners showed that project scope management, project time management and project cost management were the three most critical areas and perceived as the areas where aduate engineers may require more improvement. The results further highlighted that such PM knowledge areas should require more emphasis within EPM courses taught to undergraduate engineering students.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_US
dc.format.extent107117 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherCausal Productionsen_US
dc.publisher.placePerth, Australiaen_US
dc.publisher.urihttp://www.aaee.com.au/en_US
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_US
dc.relation.ispartofconferencenameAustralasian Association of Engineering Education (AAEE) 2011 Conferenceen_US
dc.relation.ispartofconferencetitleProceedings of the 2011 AAEE Conferenceen_US
dc.relation.ispartofdatefrom2011-01-05en_US
dc.relation.ispartofdateto2011-01-07en_US
dc.relation.ispartoflocationFremantle, Western Australiaen_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchScience, Technology and Engineering Curriculum and Pedagogyen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode130212en_US
dc.titleProject management skills for engineers: industry perceptions and implications for engineering project management courseen_US
dc.typeConference outputen_US
dc.type.descriptionE1 - Conference Publications (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeE - Conference Publicationsen_US
gro.facultyGriffith Sciences, Griffith School of Engineeringen_US
gro.rights.copyrightCopyright remains with the authors 2011. The attached file is posted here with permission of the copyright owner[s] for your personal use only. No further distribution permitted. For information about this conference please refer to the publisher’s website or contact the authors.en_US
gro.date.issued2011
gro.hasfulltextFull Text


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    Contains papers delivered by Griffith authors at national and international conferences.

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