Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorSerrao-Neumann, Silviaen_US
dc.contributor.authorLow Choy, Darrylen_US
dc.contributor.authorVan Staden, Rudien_US
dc.contributor.authorCrick, Florenceen_US
dc.contributor.authorSahin, Ozen_US
dc.contributor.authorChai, Garyen_US
dc.contributor.authorGuan, Hongen_US
dc.contributor.editorCarolyn Whitzmanen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T15:45:50Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T15:45:50Z
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.date.modified2012-08-13T23:11:32Z
dc.identifier.refurihttp://soac2011.com.au/en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/43567
dc.description.abstractInfrastructure systems and services (ISS) has a crucial role in the functioning of cities and regions. Traditionally, infrastructure planning has been determined by growth imperatives - both population and economic driven. Climate change, however, posits a new challenge to the maintenance and rehabilitation of infrastructure systems and consequently infrastructure planning. Projected increase in the frequency and intensity of extreme weather events and sea level rise, could lead to the disruption of critical infrastructure services, including telecommunications, electrical power supplies, transportation and emergency services. The disruption of infrastructure services will debilitate the economic security, public health, safety of cities and regions, therefore it is important to identify ISS weaknesses and strengths in dealing with climate change impacts. This study aims to advance the understanding by investigating how ISS are currently planned and managed in South East Queensland (SEQ) - a high growth region that has been identified as a vulnerable hot spot by the International Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) in 2007. With a focus on urban road infrastructure, SEQ's institutional and organisational capacity to maintain, repair and renew ISS is investigated in the face of climate change impacts, particularly flooding and sea level rise. This study also contributes insights into ISS management, planning and potential implications for allied sectors such as urban planning and emergency management.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_US
dc.format.extent257151 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherState of Australian Cities National Conference 2011en_US
dc.publisher.placeMelbourne, Australiaen_US
dc.publisher.urihttp://soac.fbe.unsw.edu.au/2011/welcome.htmlen_US
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_US
dc.relation.ispartofconferencenameSOAC 2011en_US
dc.relation.ispartofconferencetitleState of Australian Cities Conference 2011 Proceedingsen_US
dc.relation.ispartofdatefrom2011-11-29en_US
dc.relation.ispartofdateto2011-12-02en_US
dc.relation.ispartoflocationMelbourne, Australiaen_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchUrban and Regional Planning not elsewhere classifieden_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode120599en_US
dc.titleClimate Change Impacts on Road Infrastructure Systems and Services in South East Queensland: Implications for Infrastructure Planning and Managementen_US
dc.typeConference outputen_US
dc.type.descriptionE1 - Conference Publications (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeE - Conference Publicationsen_US
gro.facultyGriffith Sciences, Griffith School of Environmenten_US
gro.rights.copyrightCopyright remains with the authors 2011. The attached file is reproduced here in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. For information about this conference please refer to the conference’s website or contact the authors.en_US
gro.date.issued2011
gro.hasfulltextFull Text


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

  • Conference outputs
    Contains papers delivered by Griffith authors at national and international conferences.

Show simple item record