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dc.contributor.authorJones, Cindyen_US
dc.contributor.authorCreedy, Debraen_US
dc.contributor.authorGamble, Jenniferen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T14:07:38Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T14:07:38Z
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.date.modified2012-03-20T22:35:13Z
dc.identifier.issn15422011en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1542-2011.2011.00039.xen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/43671
dc.description.abstractIntroduction: Emotional care provided by midwives may improve health and well-being; reduce stress, trauma, and depressive symptoms; and enhance maternal outcomes in childbearing women. The provision of intrapartum and postpartum emotional care can be challenging and requires a good knowledge base for the provider to screen and assist distressed women. This study assessed Australian midwives' levels of knowledge and learning needs regarding antenatal depression and postpartum depression. Methods: Eight hundred and fifteen members of the Australian College of Midwives completed a postal survey, which consisted of 20 items drawn from the literature and the National Baseline Survey-Health Professional Knowledge Questionnaire. Results: On average, respondents correctly answered 62.9% of items related to antenatal depression and 70.7% of questions about postpartum depression. Many midwives were unable to identify the risk factors (70.6%) or prevalence of antenatal depression (49.6%). Nearly all (98.3%) respondents underestimated the percentage of antenatally depressed women that attempts suicide. Significant percentages of midwives did not correctly identify the incidence (44.4%), onset period (71%), and treatment options (32%) associated with postpartum depression. About half did not understand the use of antidepressant medications (48.6%) and incorrectly reported that the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale was a suitable instrument to assess symptoms of psychotic depression (43.8%). Discussion: There are key knowledge deficits relating to onset of, assessment of, and treatment for depressive symptoms during the antenatal and postpartum periods. There is a need for continuing professional education to improve midwives' knowledge and competency in the assessment and care of women suffering depression.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_US
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.en_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_US
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom353en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto361en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue4en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalJournal of Midwifery & Women’s Healthen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume56en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchMidwiferyen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode111006en_US
dc.titleAustralian Midwives' Knowledge of Antenatal and Postpartum Depression: A National Surveyen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.facultyGriffith Health, School of Nursing and Midwiferyen_US
gro.date.issued2011
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text


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