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dc.contributor.authorArklay, Traceyen_US
dc.contributor.authorTiernan, Anne-Mareeen_US
dc.contributor.authorWhite, Hughen_US
dc.contributor.editorJohn Wannaen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-24T09:57:41Z
dc.date.available2017-04-24T09:57:41Z
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.date.modified2012-03-20T22:35:53Z
dc.identifier.issn03136647en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1467-8500.2011.00738.xen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/43672
dc.description.abstractSuccessive Australian Defence Ministers have been frustrated and occasionally embarrassed by the quality of advice and information provided to them by the Defence organisation. Decades of reviews and reorganisations have failed to find solutions to the special difficulties that Defence faces in providing accurate, timely information and advice to ministers across the broad spectrum of their responsibilities. This article argues that there are multiple explanations for the concerns that are frequently expressed about its policy advisory capacity - most of which are inherent to Defence organisations around the world. While the Defence culture of secrecy is partly responsible, other factors such as the scale of Defence's operations, the multiple cultures that exist within it (military, civilian, and intelligence) that make coherence harder than in more homogenous departments, the long-time horizons of defence planning as well as the high costs of procurement, must also be considered. The erosion of trust between the organisation and minister has been exacerbated by the intense scrutiny of the media that overburdens ministers and adds another layer of complexity to their role. As history shows, there are push and pull factors that continue to embroil ministers in the minutiae of defence difficulties, while the complexity and scale of operations will undoubtedly continue to impact on the timeliness of advice.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_US
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing Asiaen_US
dc.publisher.placeAustraliaen_US
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_US
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom365en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto376en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue4en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalAustralian Journal of Public Administrationen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume70en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPublic Policyen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode160510en_US
dc.titleAdvising Ministers - The Special Problem of Defenceen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.date.issued2011
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text


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