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dc.contributor.authorDalton, Megan
dc.contributor.authorDavidson, Megan
dc.contributor.authorKeating, Jenny
dc.date.accessioned2018-01-11T01:53:48Z
dc.date.available2018-01-11T01:53:48Z
dc.date.issued2011
dc.date.modified2012-03-21T23:19:26Z
dc.identifier.issn18369553
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/S1836-9553(11)70054-6
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/43776
dc.description.abstractQuestion Is the Assessment of Physiotherapy Practice (APP) a valid instrument for the assessment of entry-level competence in physiotherapy students? Design Cross-sectional study with Rasch analysis of initial (n = 326) and validation samples (n = 318). Students were assessed on completion of 4, 5, or 6-week clinical placements across one university semester. Participants 298 clinical educators and 456 physiotherapy students at nine universities in Australia and New Zealand provided 644 completed APP instruments. Results APP data in both samples showed overall fit to a Rasch model of expected item functioning for interval scale measurement. Item 6 (Written communication) exhibited misfit in both samples, but was retained as an important element of competence. The hierarchy of item difficulty was the same in both samples with items related to professional behaviour and communication the easiest to achieve and items related to clinical reasoning the most difficult. Item difficulty was well targeted to person ability. No Differential Item Functioning was identified, indicating that the scale performed in a comparable way regardless of the student's age, gender or amount of prior clinical experience, and the educator's age, gender, or experience as an educator, or the type of facility, university, or clinical area. The instrument demonstrated unidimensionality confirming the appropriateness of summing the scale scores on each item to provide an overall score of clinical competence and was able to discriminate four levels of professional competence (Person Separation Index = 0.96). Person ability and raw APP scores had a linear relationship (r2 = 0.99). Conclusion Rasch analysis supports the interpretation that a student's APP score is an indication of their underlying level of professional competence in workplace practice.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.description.publicationstatusYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherElsevier
dc.publisher.placeAustralia
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationN
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom239
dc.relation.ispartofpageto246
dc.relation.ispartofissue4
dc.relation.ispartofjournalJournal of Physiotherapy
dc.relation.ispartofvolume57
dc.rights.retentionY
dc.subject.fieldofresearchNursing not elsewhere classified
dc.subject.fieldofresearchClinical Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchHuman Movement and Sports Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode111099
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1103
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1106
dc.titleThe Assessment of Physiotherapy Practice (APP) is a valid measure of professional competence of physiotherapy students: a cross-sectional study with Rasch analysis
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
dcterms.licensehttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
dc.description.versionVersion of Record (VoR)
gro.facultyGriffith Health, School of Rehabilitation Sciences
gro.rights.copyright© 2011 Australian Physiotherapy Association, published by Elsevier. Licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International Licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/) which permits unrestricted, non-commercial use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, providing that the work is properly cited.
gro.date.issued2011
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorDalton, Megan B.


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