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dc.contributor.authorL. Smith, Jenniferen_US
dc.contributor.authorRachel Skinner, S.en_US
dc.contributor.authorFenwick, Jenniferen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T14:56:43Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T14:56:43Z
dc.date.issued2012en_US
dc.date.modified2014-08-28T05:08:45Z
dc.identifier.issn18715192en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.wombi.2011.10.007en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/43798
dc.description.abstractPurpose The findings presented in this paper describe the beliefs and attitudes of three different groups of adolescent females about teen motherhood. These were elicited from a larger analysis that explored and theorized contraceptive pathways in a sample of young Australian women. Methods A purposive sample of females aged 14 to 19 years was recruited from three distinct populations in the city of Perth, Western Australia: (1) never-pregnant; (2) pregnant-terminated; and (3) pregnant-continued. Grounded theory principles were used to analyze data generated from 69 semi-structured interviews conducted over a 21 month period (2006-2008). Results Two categories that described teenagers' attitudes to pregnancy and motherhood were elicited from the analysis. These explained the level of priority that teenagers placed on using contraception and postponing the transition to parenthood. The category labeled 'life derailment' represented how those who had never had a pregnancy or had terminated a pregnancy constructed teen motherhood as potentially restricting their personal, career and social transition to adulthood. The alternative category, 'life-line', reflected how those who continued with their pregnancy perceived teen motherhood as a positive and transformative experience that fostered personal growth. Conclusions The findings from this study contribute further insight into the complex nature of adolescent contraceptive use and pregnancy risk. The analysis has strengthened evidence of the critical role of self-perceptions of pregnancy and childbearing on teenagers' fertility outcomes. It has also emphasized the broader life circumstances that shape these attitudes, intentions and related behavior. Strategies directed toward academic support and vocational skill development may broaden teenage girls' perceived future options and achievement capacity, thus influencing key reproductive health outcomes.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_US
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherElsevier BVen_US
dc.publisher.placeNetherlandsen_US
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_US
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom181en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto186en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue4en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalWomen and Birthen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume25en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchMedical and Health Sciences not elsewhere classifieden_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode119999en_US
dc.titlePerceptions of teen motherhood in Australian adolescent females: Life-line or life derailmenten_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.date.issued2012
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text


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