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dc.contributor.authorBikundo, Edwinen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-24T13:29:31Z
dc.date.available2017-04-24T13:29:31Z
dc.date.issued2012en_US
dc.date.modified2014-08-28T05:05:36Z
dc.identifier.issn09578536en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s10978-011-9094-1en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/43945
dc.description.abstractThis is a theoretical and empirical investigation into the causal link (if any) between international criminal trials and preventing violence through exemplary prosecutions. Specifically how do representative trials of persons accused of having the greatest responsibility for the most serious crimes of concern to the international community as a whole, supposedly bind recurrent violence? The argument pursued is that by using an accused as an example, a court engages in an indirect and uncertain substitution of personal rights for social harmony and order. These prosecutions combine a peculiar rhetoric, logic and aesthetic, all which substitute the responsibilities for a society in general to a particular individual in order to redeem that society by transferring its communal responsibility onto the individual punished as a form of atonement or expiation. International and domestic trials, as well as truth and reconciliation commissions, are part of a suite of options addressing communal mass violence that can work in tandem. However, because those convicted do not have a monopoly on criminality, nor do those merely reconciled have a monopoly on virtue, exemplification through punishment only targets a few on behalf of the many. Indeed such a redemptively sacrificial economy distinguishes legal justice from mere vengeance.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_US
dc.format.extent267974 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherSpringerLinken_US
dc.publisher.placeNetherlandsen_US
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_US
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom21en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto41en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue1en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalLaw and Critiqueen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume23en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchCriminal Law and Procedureen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchCriminology not elsewhere classifieden_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode180110en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode160299en_US
dc.titleThe International Criminal Court and Africa: Exemplary Justiceen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.facultyArts, Education & Law Group, School of Lawen_US
gro.rights.copyrightCopyright 2011 Springer Netherlands. This is an electronic version of an article published in Law and Critique, February 2012, Volume 23, Issue 1, pp 21-41. Law and Critique is available online at: www.springerlink.com with the open URL of your article.en_US
gro.date.issued2012
gro.hasfulltextFull Text


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