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dc.contributor.authorEllison, Daviden_US
dc.contributor.authorKarpin, Isabelen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T14:24:52Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T14:24:52Z
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.date.modified2012-03-28T22:19:15Z
dc.identifier.issn00382876en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1215/00382876-1382258en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/44006
dc.description.abstractAlthough in vitro fertilization patients faced with the problem of surplus cryopreserved embryos have a number of disposition options, we focus on one procedure known as "compassionate transfer." In this scenario the thawed embryo is placed in the patient's vagina, where it will not develop further, or it is transferred to the uterus without the benefit of fertility-enhancing hormones at a point in the menstrual cycle unreceptive to implantation. The embryo destined for disposal is removed from the realm of technological possibility and "returned" to the female body for a homely death. Arguably this is consistent with related mourning rituals that rely on embodied contact between the living and the dead such as the practice of wearing a lock of hair from a child or loved one. We document some contemporary practices that reconstitute the dead in keepsake form, where they may reside both inside and outside the body of the mourner. Our focus, though, is on the commemoration of embryo disposition in the form of compassionate transfer, as a ritual confounding the conditions of grievability: this is not-yet-life succumbing to something that resembles death. While debates continue over the embryo's status as life, new forms of disposition practices such as compassionate transfer are developing in response to the emotional experience of embryo loss. As a death scene in progress, we take the measure of its fabrication, considering its form, significance, and legal and cultural complexity.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_US
dc.format.extent672483 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.publisherDuke University Pressen_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_US
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom795en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto811en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue4en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalSouth Atlantic Quarterlyen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume110en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchCulture, Gender, Sexualityen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode200205en_US
dc.titleDeath without Life: Grievability and IVFen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.facultyArts, Education & Law Group, School of Humanities, Languages and Social Sciencesen_US
gro.rights.copyrightCopyright 2011 Duke University Press. The attached file is reproduced here in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. Please refer to the journal's website for access to the definitive, published version.en_US
gro.date.issued2011
gro.hasfulltextFull Text


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