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dc.contributor.authorChapman, Heatheren_US
dc.contributor.authorSimpson, Stuarten_US
dc.contributor.editorScott Markichen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T11:07:50Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T11:07:50Z
dc.date.issued2005en_US
dc.date.modified2010-07-08T08:08:44Z
dc.identifier.issn13233475en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/4414
dc.description.abstractA combination of toxicity testing using the freshwater shrimp Caradina indistincta and modelling of metal speciation has been used to assess water quality requirements for mine pit water releases from the Mt Morgan gold and copper mine site in Central Queensland to the Dee River. Analysis of the mine pit water indicated concentrations of some metals (730 mg/L Al, 35 mg/L Cu, 25 mg/L Zn) were several orders of magnitude above the Australian water quality guideline trigger values. Dilution of the mine pit water (pH 2.9) with Fletchers Creek (pH 8.3) water (a tributary of the Dee River) resulted in neutralisation to pH 5.3 and pH 6.4 at 1.5% and 0.8% dilutions, respectively, and precipitate formation. At a dilution of 0.8% mine water, dissolved concentrations of Al, Cu and Zn were calculated to be approximately 300, 2.5 and 5 times the guideline trigger values, respectively. The acute toxicity of the diluted pit water to C. indistincta (96-h exposures) was observed to be very pH dependent and was least toxic at pH 6 and most toxic at pH 5. No toxicity was observed at dilutions of 0.8% mine water at pH 6 or 7. For waters of pH 4, 5, 6 and 7, LC50 values of 1.8, 5.7, 20.5 and 12.9% pit water were determined, respectively. Calculated metals concentrations indicated that dissolved aluminium would contribute most to the observed toxicity. Speciation modelling calculations indicated that the lowest concentrations of bioavailable aluminium would occur at pH 6, consistent with waters of this pH being least toxic. The study indicated that neutralisation of pit waters to pH 6 prior for discharge would minimise toxicity to C. indistincta. Further testing using species such as algae, water fleas and fish is suggested to better assess the impact of the metal-rich waters on metal-sensitive biota.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_AU
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherAustralasian Society for Ecotoxicologyen_US
dc.publisher.placeGore Hill, NSW, Australiaen_US
dc.publisher.urihttp://www.ecotox.org.au/en_AU
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom93en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto99en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue2en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalAustralasian Journal of Ecotoxicologyen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume11en_US
dc.rights.retentionNen_AU
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode300804en_US
dc.titleToxicity of Acid Water from Mt Morgan Mine Site, Central Queensland, to the Freshwater Shrimp Caradina Indistinctaen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.facultyGriffith Sciences, Griffith School of Environmenten_US
gro.date.issued2005
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text


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