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dc.contributor.authorKim, Mijungen_US
dc.contributor.authorRoth, Wolff-Michaelen_US
dc.contributor.authorThom, Jenniferen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-24T13:37:58Z
dc.date.available2017-04-24T13:37:58Z
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.date.modified2012-04-10T22:45:32Z
dc.identifier.issn15710068en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s10763-010-9240-5en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/44366
dc.description.abstractThere is mounting research evidence that contests the metaphysical perspective of knowing as mental process detached from the physical world. Yet education, especially in its teaching and learning practices, continues to treat knowledge as something that is necessarily and solely expressed in ideal verbal form. This study is part of a funded project that investigates the role of the body in knowing and learning mathematics. Based on a 3-week (15 1-h lessons) video study of 1-s grade mathematics classroom (N = 24), we identify 4 claims: (a) gestures support children's thinking and knowing, (b) gestures co-emerge with peers' gestures in interactive situations, (c) gestures cope with the abstractness of concepts, and (d) children's bodies exhibit geometrical knowledge. We conclude that children think and learn through their bodies. Our study suggests to educators that conventional images of knowledge as being static and abstract in nature need to be rethought so that it not only takes into account verbal and written languages and text but also recognizes the necessary ways in which children's knowledge is embodied in and expressed through their bodies.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_US
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.publisherSpringeren_US
dc.publisher.placeNetherlandsen_US
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_US
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom207en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto238en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue1en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalInternational Journal of Science and Mathematics Educationen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume9en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchMathematics and Numeracy Curriculum and Pedagogyen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode130208en_US
dc.titleChildren’s gestures and the embodied knowledge of geometryen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.date.issued2011
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text


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